retina

(redirected from Retinal diseases)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

ret·i·na

 (rĕt′n-ə)
n. pl. ret·i·nas or ret·i·nae (rĕt′n-ē′)
A delicate, multilayered, light-sensitive membrane lining the inner eyeball and connected by the optic nerve to the brain.

[Middle English, from Medieval Latin rētina, from Latin rēte, net.]

ret′i·nal adj.

retina

(ˈrɛtɪnə)
n, pl -nas or -nae (-ˌniː)
(Anatomy) the light-sensitive membrane forming the inner lining of the posterior wall of the eyeball, composed largely of a specialized terminal expansion of the optic nerve. Images focused here by the lens of the eye are transmitted to the brain as nerve impulses
[C14: from Medieval Latin, perhaps from Latin rēte net]
ˈretinal adj

ret•i•na

(ˈrɛt n ə, ˈrɛt nə)

n., pl. ret•i•nas, ret•i•nae (ˈrɛt nˌi)
the innermost coat of the posterior part of the eyeball that receives the image produced by the lens, is continuous with the optic nerve, and consists of several layers, one of which contains the rods and cones that are sensitive to light.
[1350–1400; Middle English ret(h)ina < Medieval Latin rētina, perhaps = Latin rēt-, s. of rēte net + -ina -ine3]

Ret•in-A

(ˌrɛt nˈeɪ)
Trademark.
a brand of tretinoin, used esp. to reduce wrinkles caused by overexposure to the sun.

ret·i·na

(rĕt′n-ə)
The light-sensitive membrane that lines the inside of the back of the eyeball, connected to the brain by the optic nerve. The retina of vertebrate animals contains specialized cells, called rods and cones, that absorb light.

retina

- From Latin rete, "net," as there is a net of nerves making up this layer of the eyeball.
See also related terms for net.

retina


click for a larger image
The back of the eyeball where neurons convert light into electrical impulses that pass through the brain. See cones, rods
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.retina - the innermost light-sensitive membrane covering the back wall of the eyeballretina - the innermost light-sensitive membrane covering the back wall of the eyeball; it is continuous with the optic nerve
neuroepithelium - epithelium associated with special sense organs and containing sensory nerve endings
eye, oculus, optic - the organ of sight
tissue layer, membrane - a pliable sheet of tissue that covers or lines or connects the organs or cells of animals or plants
fovea, fovea centralis - area consisting of a small depression in the retina containing cones and where vision is most acute
parafovea - area of the retina immediately surrounding the fovea
macula lutea, macular area, yellow spot, macula - a small yellowish central area of the retina that is rich in cones and that mediates clear detailed vision
visual cell - one of the cells of the retina that is sensitive to light
optic disc, optic disk, blind spot - the point where the optic nerve enters the retina; not sensitive to light
cone cell, retinal cone, cone - a visual receptor cell in the retina that is sensitive to bright light and to color
retinal rod, rod cell, rod - a visual receptor cell that is sensitive to dim light
Translations
شَبَكِيَّة العَيْن
sítnice
nethinderetina
NetzhautRetina
retina
sjónhimna
tinklainė
tīklene
sietnica
ağ tabakaretina

retina

[ˈretɪnə] N (retinas or retinae (pl)) [ˈretɪniː] (Anat) → retina f

retina

[ˈrɛtɪnə] nrétine f

retina

n pl <-e or -s> → Netzhaut f, → Retina f (spec)

retina

[ˈrɛtɪnə] nretina

retina

(ˈretinə) noun
the part of the back of the eye that receives the image of what is seen.

ret·i·na

n. retina, la capa más interna del ojo que recibe imágenes y transmite impulsos visuales al cerebro;
detachment of the ___desprendimiento de la ___.

retina

n (pl -nas o -nae) retina; detached — desprendimiento de retina
References in periodicals archive ?
Retinal diseases account for a significant share of the vision loss burden, compared to other eye-related diseases that can cause blindness.
The companies established this collaboration to explore the delivery of genome editing medicines to treat up to five inherited retinal diseases.
Hence, in order to help provide free treatment for retinal diseases to deserving patients, Prof.
Evotec AG announced that it has entered into a research collaboration with the Center for Regenerative Therapies TU Dresden ("CRTD") to discover novel small molecule candidates for retinal diseases.
Through the collaboration, Evotec and CRTD aim to discover novel small molecule candidates for retinal diseases.
Long established (3) Ophthalmologist vision offices that specialize in the treatment of retinal diseases, including diabetic eye disease, macular degeneration, retinal tears and detachments, floater, medical and surgical retinal disease and laser surgery.
One of the advantages of using tamoxifen as a treatment for denegerative retinal diseases was that it was already approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, and had a long history of use in humans, he explained.
As the world's population ages, retinal diseases will affect an ever-increasing number of people.
Diabetic patients were more prone to developing retinal diseases and needed to have regular eye checkups even if their eye sight was not weak.
They said diabetic patients were more prone to developing retinal diseases and needed to have regular eye checkups even if their eye sight was not weak.
3, 2014 -- Market researcher Visiongain has published a market research report that forecasts global revenue predictions to 2024 for four therapeutic submarkets: wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD), dry AMD, diabetic retinopathy (DR), and other retinal diseases, including geographic atrophy (GA) and diabetic macular edema/edema (DME).
In addition to discussing such retinal diseases as diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, retinal artery occlusion, inherited macular dystrophies, and intraocular tumors, they address the relevance of the blood-retinal barrier to retinal disease, developmental pathologies in infants, and non-invasive imaging techniques.