retiree

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re·tir·ee

 (rĭ-tīr′ē′)
n.
One who has retired from active working life.

retiree

(rɪˈtaɪəˌriː)
n
(Industrial Relations & HR Terms) chiefly US a person who has retired from work

re•tir•ee

(rɪ taɪˈri, -ˈtaɪər i)

n.
a person who has retired from working.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.retiree - someone who has retired from active workingretiree - someone who has retired from active working
nonworker - a person who does nothing
emeritus - a professor or minister who is retired from assigned duties
Translations
nyugdíjas
upokojenec

retiree

[rɪˈtaɪəˌriː] N (US) → jubilado/a m/f

retiree

[rɪˌtaɪəˈriː] n (mainly US)retraité(e) m/f

retiree

nRuheständler(in) m(f)

retiree

n. jubilado-a; retirado-a.
References in periodicals archive ?
We provide continuing medical and dental benefits to retirees, at the same levels of coverage as those of active employees.
About 9 million private sector retirees rely on these benefits.
For retirees, the source of health care benefits may be medicare, individual insurance plans, former employer policies, or a combination of these.
Fauerso (pronounced Farso) asked Chevron to fund a tree-planting campaign by Chevron retirees.
The purpose of this study was to determine: (a) the number of retirees between 1987-1999; (b) what position classifications would be impacted the most; (c) where the positions are geographically located; and (d) demographic patterns (education, race, sex) related to retirees.
2 million retirees found that few companies have already taken action with respect to their pre-65 strategies.
Over the next two years, more than half of the employers surveyed that provide health care to pre-65 retirees are planning significant changes to their medical benefits and how those benefits are delivered, according to data from global professional services company Towers Watson.
The percentage of non-working retirees over age 65 with retiree health benefits now sits at 16 percent.
Four in 10 retirees (38 percent) and half of pre-retirees (49 percent) say they are much more concerned about their financial situation in retirement than they were prior to the economic downturn.
employers to shift more and more of the cost of health benefits to retirees and, in some cases, even to eliminate retiree health benefits entirely.
Call it by either term, but this is what the city of Worcester has committed for many years to enroll over 80 percent of its retirees into Medicare.
As these standards are implemented and the extent of the related liabilities become known, questions have been raised about whether the public sector can continue to provide the current level of benefits to its retirees.