retroactive inhibition

(redirected from Retroactive interference)
Also found in: Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to Retroactive interference: Retroactive inhibition, Weber's law, Proactive interference

retroactive inhibition

or

retroactive interference

n
(Psychology) psychol the tendency for the retention of learned material or skills to be impaired by subsequent learning, esp by learning of a similar kind. Compare proactive inhibition
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The total number of words evoked in each list is recorded, in addition to forgetting speed, proactive interference scores (list B1 /list A1) and retroactive interference (list A6 / A5 list).
A forced conversion without considering the income situation or the debt service capability of the customer is a severe retroactive interference with existing contracts.
In other words, proactive intereference occurs when earlier learning interferes with subsequent learning and retroactive interference occurs when new learning interferes with old learning.
Other research has shown that reward omission can produce retroactive interference with memory for a previously visited maze location (Terry, 1996), suggesting that omission can affect memory processing.
The results replicated the well-known effect of renewal of the cue-outcome relationship due to a context change after a retroactive interference treatment, as much as the null effect of the context change upon acquisition before retroactive interference training had taken place (Experiment 2).
It sets a worrisome precedent of federal, retroactive interference and intrusion into state and local authority and ability to issue debt to meet public needs.
The first purpose of the present study was to produce such evidence using a retroactive interference paradigm in a learning experiment.
Two kinds of interference - namely, proactive and retroactive interference - have received most of the attention.
Koster, Degel, and Piper (2002) reported that retroactive interference affected an implicit odor memory task, in which participants were asked to judge the 'goodness of fit' between pictures of a room and particular odors.
Retroactive interference between cues trained apart has been regarded as an effect that occurs because the target and interfering associations share a common outcome.
They found that a retention interval, a context change, or the combination of these two factors after interference training led to retrieval of the original relationship between the medicine and side effect 1, attenuating retroactive interference.
Two experiments explored retroactive interference in human predictive learning.