Ten Commandments

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Ten Commandments

pl.n. Bible
The ten injunctions given by God to Moses on Mount Sinai, serving as the basis of Mosaic Law.

Ten Commandments

pl n
(Bible) the Ten Commandments Old Testament the commandments summarizing the basic obligations of man towards God and his fellow men, delivered to Moses on Mount Sinai engraved on two tables of stone (Exodus 20:1–17). Also known as: the Decalogue

Ten′ Command′ments


n.pl.
the precepts spoken by God to Israel, delivered to Moses on Mount Sinai; the Decalogue.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Ten Commandments - the biblical commandments of MosesTen Commandments - the biblical commandments of Moses  
Translations
Diez MandamientosDiez Palabras
tízparancsolat
boðorðin tíu
cele zece porunci
References in periodicals archive ?
The notion of a Mosaic revelation at Sinai endured .
Flowers take on a special role during next week's holiday of Shavuot, which commemorates a central moment in the formation of the Jewish people: the revelation at Sinai, when the Israelites received the Torah.
Indeed, Dorff is uncertain that there was any substantive revelation at Sinai ("I cannot unequivocally affirm or deny belief in a verbal communication at Sinai .
The idea of a literal revelation at Sinai is also indigestible for many, despite its honored place in Jewish tradition.
By the time one reaches the aftermath of the Revelation at Sinai in Canto 18, the Israelites are fully imbued with this renewed knowledge of God and his Torah and eagerly assent to a renewal of the Covenant.
The story of Abraham, the revelation at Sinai, the construction of the temple, the observance of Sabbath, and a series of crises about the land (spy story), the cult (the Korah rebellion), and even Mosaic leadership (especially his sin in Numbers 20) are read in the framework of the opening Priestly cosmology.
Or by "Judaism" people may mean a religious community, a social entity that all together takes a position in response to the revelation at Sinai, whether Reform or Orthodox or any of the other Judaisms that flourish.
The analysis covers such interpretative phenomena as the removal or re-interpretation of anthropomorphisms and the general trend towards a concentration of the theophany motif in relation to the revelation at Sinai (to which chapter six devotes special attention) and in the eschaton.