Revocability


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Related to Revocability: scrutinisation

Rev`o`ca`bil´i`ty


n.1.The quality of being revocable; as, the revocability of a law.
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References in periodicals archive ?
40) Nevertheless, even under the legislation, the courts continued to recognize the doctrine of revocability whenever possible.
Early reformers of arbitration law challenged this revocability rule as "an anachronism [to] be eliminated as soon as possible.
To improve the bargaining position of the UK, to ensure we retain the opt-outs and rebates that we presently enjoy, and to place the decision entirely in the hands of the UK's Parliament and -- if it chooses -- its people, we must seek to establish a legal route to revocability," he wrote in an explanatory blog.
This research project aims to develop a framework for a secure biometric cryptosystem by protecting biometric templates derived from the fusion of palm prints and palm veins to satisfy four biometric cryptosystem and template security criteria: Security, diversity, revocability, and accuracy of performance.
He said: "The author of Article 50 himself, Lord Kerr, has today attested to its revocability.
After birth, the substitution of one set of legal parents for another would be governed by adoption law, with rules about the revocability of consent, screening of the adoptive parent, and so on.
discretionary revocability of representatives (recall).
The fingerprint template is transformed into non-invertible forms, called cancellable templates, to provide revocability as well as privacy to the fingerprint data.
Privacy must be constrainable, as in the cases of conditional privacy and revocability.
Special circumstances might make revoking certain acts impossible, or that power might be withheld, but a presumption of revocability is often implied if the grant is silent.