figure of speech

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Related to Rhetorical figure: rhetorical device, figures of speech

figure of speech

n. pl. figures of speech
An expression that uses language in a nonliteral way, such as a metaphor or synecdoche, or in a structured or unusual way, such as anaphora or chiasmus, or that employs sounds, such as alliteration or assonance, to achieve a rhetorical effect.

figure of speech

n
(Rhetoric) an expression of language, such as simile, metaphor, or personification, by which the usual or literal meaning of a word is not employed

fig′ure of speech′



n.
an expression in which words are used in a nonliteral sense, as in metaphor, or in an unusual construction, as in antithesis, or for their sounds, as in onomatopoeia, to suggest vivid images or to heighten effect.
[1815–25]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.figure of speech - language used in a figurative or nonliteral sense
cakewalk - an easy accomplishment; "winning the tournament was a cakewalk for him"; "invading Iraq won't be a cakewalk"
blind alley - (figurative) a course of action that is unproductive and offers no hope of improvement; "all the clues led the police into blind alleys"; "so far every road that we've been down has turned out to be a blind alley"
megahit, smash hit, blockbuster - an unusually successful hit with widespread popularity and huge sales (especially a movie or play or recording or novel)
sleeper - an unexpected hit; "that movie was the sleeper of the summer"
home run, bell ringer, bull's eye, mark - something that exactly succeeds in achieving its goal; "the new advertising campaign was a bell ringer"; "scored a bull's eye"; "hit the mark"; "the president's speech was a home run"
housecleaning - (figurative) the act of reforming by the removal of unwanted personnel or practices or conditions; "more housecleaning is in store at other accounting firms"; "many employees were discharged in a general housecleaning by the new owners"
goldbrick - anything that is supposed to be valuable but turns out to be worthless
lens - (metaphor) a channel through which something can be seen or understood; "the writer is the lens through which history can be seen"
rhetorical device - a use of language that creates a literary effect (but often without regard for literal significance)
conceit - an elaborate poetic image or a far-fetched comparison of very dissimilar things
irony - a trope that involves incongruity between what is expected and what occurs
exaggeration, hyperbole - extravagant exaggeration
kenning - conventional metaphoric name for something, used especially in Old English and Old Norse poetry
metaphor - a figure of speech in which an expression is used to refer to something that it does not literally denote in order to suggest a similarity
metonymy - substituting the name of an attribute or feature for the name of the thing itself (as in `they counted heads')
oxymoron - conjoining contradictory terms (as in `deafening silence')
prosopopoeia, personification - representing an abstract quality or idea as a person or creature
simile - a figure of speech that expresses a resemblance between things of different kinds (usually formed with `like' or `as')
synecdoche - substituting a more inclusive term for a less inclusive one or vice versa
zeugma - use of a word to govern two or more words though appropriate to only one; "`Mr. Pickwick took his hat and his leave' is an example of zeugma"
domino effect - the consequence of one event setting off a chain of similar events (like a falling domino causing a whole row of upended dominos to fall)
flip side - a different aspect of something (especially the opposite aspect); "the flip side of your positive qualities sometimes get out of control"; "on the flip side of partnerships he talked about their competition"
period - the end or completion of something; "death put a period to his endeavors"; "a change soon put a period to my tranquility"
summer - the period of finest development, happiness, or beauty; "the golden summer of his life"
dawn - an opening time period; "it was the dawn of the Roman Empire"
evening - a later concluding time period; "it was the evening of the Roman Empire"
rainy day - a (future) time of financial need; "I am saving for a rainy day"

figure of speech

noun expression, image, turn of phrase, trope It was just a figure of speech.

Figures of speech

alliteration, allusion, anacoluthia, anadiplosis, analogy, anaphora, anastrophe, antiphrasis, antithesis, antonomasia, apophasis, aporia, aposiopesis, apostrophe, catachresis, chiasmus, circumlocution, climax, emphasis, epanaphora, epanorthosis, exclamation, gemination, hendiadys, hypallage, hyperbaton, hyperbole, hysteron proteron, inversion, irony, kenning, litotes, malapropism, meiosis, metaphor, metonymy, onomatopoeia, oxymoron, paralipsis or paraleipsis, parenthesis, periphrasis, personification, pleonasm, polysyndeton, prolepsis, prosopopoeia or prosopopeia, repetition, rhetorical question, sarcasm, simile, spoonerism, syllepsis, synechdoche, tmesis, zeugma
Translations
إستِعارَه، تَشْبيه
figura
billedligt udtryk
kielikuva
façon de parlerfigure de style
szókép
líking, myndhverfing
figura de linguagem
talesätt

figure of speech

nfigura retorica
it's just a figure of speech (fig) → è solo un modo di dire

figure

(ˈfigə) , ((American) ˈfigjər) noun
1. the form or shape of a person. A mysterious figure came towards me; That girl has got a good figure.
2. a (geometrical) shape. The page was covered with a series of triangles, squares and other geometrical figures.
3. a symbol representing a number. a six-figure telephone number.
4. a diagram or drawing to explain something. The parts of a flower are shown in figure 3.
verb
1. to appear (in a story etc). She figures largely in the story.
2. to think, estimate or consider. I figured that you would arrive before half past eight.
ˈfigurative (-rətiv) adjective
of or using figures of speech. figurative language.
ˈfiguratively adverb
ˈfigurehead noun
1. a person who is officially a leader but who does little or has little power. She is the real leader of the party – he is only a figurehead.
2. an ornamental figure (usually of carved wood) attached to the front of a ship.
figure of speech
one of several devices (eg metaphor, simile) for using words not with their ordinary meanings but to make a striking effect.
figure out
to understand. I can't figure out why he said that.
References in periodicals archive ?
In each chapter, she identifies a rhetorical figure that generates the work's difference and repetition, focusing on what a given text does rather than what it means.
Alternate realities and multiple vantage points thus constitute the novels conceptual core, projecting into the field of our reading eyes a virtual world where characters interact across time and space and where the Antikythera device functions as a rhetorical figure for "time travel" into the past, therefore as the metaphor of our repressed memories and the world's historical unconscious.
It is at this meeting of interior and exterior difficulties that the rhetorical figure becomes crucial in the dialogue between Hegel on the modern hero and Schiller in Wallenstein.
It seems entirely on the mark that Spenser, the Ovidian poet of exile, would embrace the rhetorical figure of trespass with the same gusto that Christopher Marlowe famously embraced the trope of hyperbole or, as Harry Levin illuminated (drawing again on Puttenham), the Over-reacher.
It wasn't just a rhetorical figure put in the communique for publicity purposes.
In both novels, the rhetorical figure of the outlaw is used in order to politicize oppressed communities.
When a rhetorical figure is embodied visually, both discursive and imagistic elaboration may result.
Synecdoche--the part for the whole--is the rhetorical figure that underlies the structure of these works, but the whole is no longer imaginable.
Gothic writers often maneuver readers into situations where the judgment is required but forestalled by conflicting values or narratives--a situation Monnet defines through the rhetorical figure of paradiastole and Lyotard's notion of the differand.
1) Thus the rhetorical figure of paresia, or franc parler, is commonly used.
is termed a "construct" (6) and a "rhetorical device" (21); the rhetorical figure of descriptio is a "trope" (24); rhetorical invention "represents a rather complex and somewhat diverse body of writing" (my emphasis, 15), "posterity" is frequently used as a synonym for "memory"; and the Espurgatoire seint Patriz, which describes a journey to the otherworld, is "hagiographic" (138).
Interestingly, the writer who most condemns the maternal metaphor (Hippel) does so at the price of alienating his audience, while Sotiropoulos finds that the female writers Amalia Holst and Betty Gleim make skillful use of this rhetorical figure in constructing alternate professional possibilities for women educators.