Rhine

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Rhine

 (rīn)
A river of western Europe rising in eastern Switzerland and flowing about 1,320 km (820 mi) north and northwest through Germany and the Netherlands to the North Sea. A major route for travel and commercial shipping, it has historically been of great economic and military importance.

Rhine

(raɪn)
n
(Placename) a river in central and W Europe, rising in SE Switzerland: flows through Lake Constance north through W Germany and west through the Netherlands to the North Sea. Length: about 1320 km (820 miles). Dutch name: Rijn French name: Rhin German name: Rhein

Rhine

(raɪn)

n.
a river flowing from SE Switzerland through Germany and the Netherlands into the North Sea. 820 mi. (1320 km) long. German, Rhein. French, Rhin (r a n).Dutch, Rijn.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Rhine - United States parapsychologist (1895-1980)
2.Rhine - a major European river carrying more traffic than any other river in the worldRhine - a major European river carrying more traffic than any other river in the world; flows into the North Sea
Deutschland, FRG, Germany, Federal Republic of Germany - a republic in central Europe; split into East Germany and West Germany after World War II and reunited in 1990
France, French Republic - a republic in western Europe; the largest country wholly in Europe
Holland, Kingdom of The Netherlands, Nederland, Netherlands, The Netherlands - a constitutional monarchy in western Europe on the North Sea; half the country lies below sea level
Schweiz, Suisse, Svizzera, Swiss Confederation, Switzerland - a landlocked federal republic in central Europe
Translations
Rýn
Rejno
Rein
Rein
Rajna
Rín
Rhenus
Ren
Rhen

Rhine

[raɪn]
A. N the Rhineel Rin
B. CPD Rhine wine Nvino m blanco del Rin

Rhine

[ˈraɪn] n
the Rhine → le Rhin

Rhine

nRhein m; Rhine wineRheinwein m

Rhine

:
Rhineland
nRheinland nt
Rhinelander
nRheinländer(in) m(f)
rhinestone
nRheinkiesel m

Rhine

[raɪn] n the Rhineil Reno
References in periodicals archive ?
27) These interests offer another point of contact with, and differentiation from, the work of Hans Haacke, who in the same years took up with both the physical and "systemic" and the social and ecological implications of water in his first solo exhibition, Wind and Water at Galerie Schmela, Dusseldorf (1965); Condensation Cube (1963-65), exhibited the following year at the Howard Wise Gallery in New York; and Rhinewater Purification Plant (1972).
This is what puts Saraceno in the company of artists such as Hans Haacke (and his Rhinewater Purification Plant, 1972) and Michael Joaquin Grey (whose ZOOB, 1997, is a toy for designing biomimicry systems that fuse art with science).
The players are in a hidden orchestra-pit of Bayreuth-like proportions, above which the tiny stage is cunningly given dimensions which seem to make it vast: swinging grids over which characters climb and watch the action below, a raised circular ramp which creates telling perspectives, a cyclorama where simple lighting gobos suggest Wery furnaces and rising and falling Rhinewaters.