rhomboid

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rhom·boid

 (rŏm′boid′)
n.
A parallelogram with unequal adjacent sides, especially one having oblique angles.
adj. also rhom·boi·dal (-boid′l)
Shaped like a rhombus or rhomboid.

rhomboid

(ˈrɒmbɔɪd)
n
(Mathematics) a parallelogram having adjacent sides of unequal length
adj
(Mathematics) having such a shape
[C16: from Late Latin rhomboides, from Greek rhomboeidēs shaped like a rhombus]

rhom•boid

(ˈrɒm bɔɪd)

n.
1. an oblique-angled parallelogram with only the opposite sides equal.
adj.
3. Also, rhom•boi′dal. having a form similar to that of a rhombus; shaped like a rhomboid.
[1560–70; < Late Latin rhomboīdes < Greek rhomboeidḕs (schêma) rhomboid (form, shape). See rhombus, -oid]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rhomboid - a parallelogram with adjacent sides of unequal lengthsrhomboid - a parallelogram with adjacent sides of unequal lengths; an oblique-angled parallelogram with only the opposite sides equal
parallelogram - a quadrilateral whose opposite sides are both parallel and equal in length
2.rhomboid - any of several muscles of the upper back that help move the shoulder blade
skeletal muscle, striated muscle - a muscle that is connected at either or both ends to a bone and so move parts of the skeleton; a muscle that is characterized by transverse stripes
greater rhomboid muscle, musculus rhomboideus major, rhomboideus major muscle - rhomboid muscle that draws the scapula toward the spinal column
lesser rhomboid muscle, musculus rhomboideus minor, rhomboid minor muscle - rhomboid muscle that draws the scapula toward the vertebral column and slightly upward
Adj.1.rhomboid - shaped like a rhombus or rhomboid; "rhomboidal shapes"
Translations

rhomboid

[ˈrɒmbɔɪd]
A. ADJromboidal
B. Nromboide m

rhomboid

nRhomboid nt
adjrhomboid
References in periodicals archive ?
The outermost wrappings have been arranged in an ornate geometric pattern of overlapping rhomboids and also serve to frame the portrait.
The girl's body is wrapped in several layers of linen, and the outermost wrappings are ordered in intricate geometric patterns, with overlapping rhomboids framing the portrait.
The diagnosis for these patients varied from no diagnosis to thoracic degenerative discogenic pain, costovertebral joint dysfunction, levator scapulae syndrome, thoracic facet syndrome, dorsal back strain, myofascial pain of the rhomboids and finally DSN entrapment.
This is because remaining in these positions for long periods of time lengthens the rhomboids and shortens the pectoral muscles in the chest (which work in opposition to the rhomboids), creating a muscular imbalance that can result in back pain.
Moving up the body, the rhomboids (the muscles between the shoulder blades and spine) become weak from our tendency to round the upper back.
Biaxial integral geogrid products are a polymer grid or mesh material (whether or not finished, slit, cut-to-length, attached to woven or non-woven fabric or sheet material, or packaged) in which four-sided openings in the form of squares, rectangles, rhomboids, diamonds, or other four-sided figures predominate.
The following muscles may be found to be lengthened and taut/tight: rhomboids, middle and lower trapezius, serratus anterior, longus colli and capitis, infraspinatus and teres minor, and thoracic paraspinals (erector spinae and transversospinalis).
Formally reminiscent of Brancusi, many of the sculptures probe the spatial-visual effect of irregular serial arrangements; Stack of Five MDF Painted Sculpture 004, 2014, for example, consists of five elements, each a pile of rhomboids and irregular quadrilaterals.
The rhomboids have a tendency to house numerous trigger points and can be surprisingly sensitive.
But muscles such as the trapezius, rhomboids and lats will help sculpt a v-shaped back.
The sunlight, even in the further depths, moves in interconnected patterns of elastic skeins and rhomboids that contract and expand above the stones and boulders, illuminating the fine vegetation that clings to them like down on surfaces of skin.
It is a natural reaction to tense your shoulders when you're under stress (similar to how animals react to danger in the wild), but the constant activation of these muscles causes a severe ache in your trapezius and rhomboids (muscles of the back), muscles used to raise your shoulders.