rhythm and blues

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rhythm and blues

pl.n. (used with a sing. or pl. verb) Abbr. R & B
A style of music developed by African Americans that combines blues and jazz, characterized by a strong backbeat and repeated variations on syncopated instrumental phrases.

rhythm and blues

n
(Pop Music) (functioning as singular) any of various kinds of popular music derived from or influenced by the blues. Abbreviation: R & B

rhythm′ and blues′


n.
a folk-based form of black popular music forerunning rock.
[1945–50, Amer.]

rhythm and blues

A very popular and wide-ranging style of music that emerged from traditional blues in the 1940s. R&B can be characterized by its use of blues chords played over a strong and consistent backbeat and by its emphasis on composition rather than the improvisation common in traditional blues. Hip hop, rap, soul, and disco are all categories of R&B and R&B also formed the foundation of rock and roll.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rhythm and blues - a combination of blues and jazz that was developed in the United States by Black musicians; an important precursor of rock 'n' roll
African-American music, black music - music created by African-American musicians; early forms were songs that had a melodic line and a strong rhythmic beat with repeated choruses
popular music, popular music genre - any genre of music having wide appeal (but usually only for a short time)
References in periodicals archive ?
Summary: Friends and family of Etta James have remembered the influential 1950s rhythm-and-blues singer at a funeral service near Los Angeles.
He was equally at home at a high-society soiree or an rhythm-and-blues club, the kind of place where, in the 1950s, he found the performers who went on to make hits for Atlantic Records, one of the most successful American independent music labels.
Django Reinhardt and the Illustrated History of Gypsy Jazz traces the style's evolution and the career of the man who embodied it through the horrors of World War II, when the Nazis severely persecuted the Gypsies in Europe, and onward to Gypsy Jazz's rhythm-and-blues legacy for the modern day.
Jump to George Bush's 1989 inaugural, featuring performances by rhythm-and-blues legends Albert Collins, Willie Dixon, Koko Taylor, Bo Diddley, Percy Sledge, Carla Thomas, Eddie Floyd, and Sam of Sam & Dave, among others.
Known as "The Girl with a Tear in her Voice," "The Original Queen of Rhythm & Blues," "Miss Rhythm & Blues," and the well-known moniker of "Miss Rhythm," the first rhythm-and-blues singer, Ruth Brown is a living legend.