Li Bai

(redirected from Rihaku)

Li Bai

 (lē′ bī′)
See Li Po.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In Cathay, Pound calls Li Bai (0,Li Po, Li Bo, Ri Haku), by the name Rihaku.
specifically the piquant Rihaku junmai ginjo is a symphony that
For his prized black rice specialties, he picks Fukucho "Moon on the Water" Junmai Ginjyo at $13 for 300ml or Rihaku "Dreamy Clouds" Unfiltered Tokubetsu Junmai at $14 for 300ml.
Rihaku Nigori "Dreamy Clouds" Tokubetsu Junmai, 300ml ($13.
Cathay: Translations from Ezra Pound, for the most part from the Chinese of Rihaku, from the notes of the late Ernest Fenollosa, and the decipherings of professors Mori and Ariga.
In Cathay, (4) using Ernest Fenollosa's (5) notes, Pound published fourteen poems, mostly by Rihaku (the Japanese name of Li Po that Pound and Fenollosa used), an eighth-century Chinese poet.
It doesn't really change my main point, though; in fact, it strengthens it: why call Li Po Rihaku anyway if not to obscure his stature?
The enemy arrows of Bunno become the German artillery, the Chinese frontier of Rihaku the Western front, the Knossos labyrinth a German "Irrgarten lit with pale battery-powered lights" (7; 143).
Since Cathay's frontispiece announced its contents as "Translations by Ezra Pound for the most part from the Chinese of Rihaku," Pound's poetic innovations naturally appeared to stem from his Chinese sources.
Orage also noted the similarity between Browning's "Bishop Bloughram's Apology" and Pound's "The River-Merchant's Wife: a Letter" in terms of their "natural" simplicity: "The difference is that Browning was 'perfecting' the expression of a powerful and subtle mind, while Rihaku was perfecting the mind relatively of a child.
The fourteen poems in the first Cathay represent Pound's workings-up from transliterations in the notebooks of the sinologist Ernest Fenollosa; what Fenollosa transliterated were, mainly, poems by the eighth-century Tang poet Li Po, whom he, using a Japanese form, called Rihaku.
Pound himself acknowledged his debt to the Chinese poet by introducing Cathay (1915) as a book "for the most part from the Chinese of Rihaku [Li Po]" (P 130).