ring of gyges


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ring of gyges

A magic ring believed to make the wearer invisible.
References in classic literature ?
The next day must clear up every doubt; and unless his near neighbor and would-be friend, the Count of Monte Cristo, possessed the ring of Gyges, and by its power was able to render himself invisible, it was very certain he could not escape this time.
A reading of Crimes and Misdemeanors by John Pappas uses Plato's myth of the ring of Gyges as a means to discuss issues of justice as they emerge within Allen's film; a reading of Another Woman by Jill Gordon uses Plato's thoughts on self-knowledge in Alcibiades in order to introduce the notion that Marion in the film comes to an awareness of self through her encounter with the "other woman"; and, finally, a reading of The Curse of the Jade Scorpion (2001) by Mary Nichols compares Allen's film to the film version of The Maltese Falcon (1941).
Prior work on source texts has led to excellent connections being drawn between the One Ring and Plato's Ring of Gyges in The Republic (Cox) and various works of medieval literature, including the Norse Sagas and the Nibelungenlied (Shippey, The Road to Middle-earth).
If he'd accused him of behaving like an ancient Persian Satrap eguipped with the ring of Gyges I could understand the need for an explanation.
The Influence of the Phaedo on the De Revolutionibus"; Heikki Mikkeli, "Art and Nature in the Renaissance Commentaries and Textbooks on Aristotle's Physics"; Ullrich Langer, "The Ring of Gyges in Plato, Cicero, and Lorenzo Valla: The Moral Force of Fictional Examples"; Ian Maclean, "Legal Fictions and fictional entities in Renaissance jurisprudence"; Marie-Luce Demoner, "Les etres de raison, ou les modes d'etre de la litterature"; Massimo Luigi Bianchi, "Signs, Signaturae and Natursprache in Paracelsus and Bome"; Nancy G.
Were they to become strong, to possess the ring of Gyges, those previously weak would sleep with the queen, kill the king, and so fulfill their deepest longing--to have the fulfillment of no desire denied them.
In the course of their discussion, Glaucon and Socrates allude to an old Greek story, "The Ring of Gyges.
But if we possessed the ring of Gyges, there would be no good reason for doing the good.
Socrates spends the rest of the Republic responding to this plea so that by the final book, after a long evening of discourse, Glaucon supposedly understands why he would choose justice rather than rule, why he would follow Socrates rather than Thrasymachus, and why he would toss the ring of Gyges far away were he to come upon it by chance.
The oldest ring of invisibility known is the Ring of Gyges, a classical legend told by Plato (in The Republic) and also by Cicero ("De Officiis").