Ring of the Nibelung


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Ring of the Nibelung

n
1. (European Myth & Legend) German myth a magic ring on which the dwarf Alberich placed a curse after it was stolen from him
2. (Classical Music) the four operas by Wagner, Das Rheingold (1869), Die Walküre (1870), Siegfried (1876), and Götterdämmerung (1876), based on this myth. Often shortened to: The Ring
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The author organized the main body of his text in seven chapters devoted to Richard WagnerEs ideal, art and philosophy, an outline of the drama Jesus of Nazareth, The Ring of the Nibelung or Tetralogy, Tristan and Isolde, Parsifal, and a variety of other related subjects.
Still in Dresden, he wrote a sketch of a Nibelung legend in 1848, and while in exile in Switzerland he completed the poetic libretti of the four-part Ring of the Nibelung, destined to be the grandest multi-media work of art of the nineteenth century.
The Ring of the Nibelung is a 15-hour tetralogy that remains the most ambitious work of art ever produced.
Emslie cites Schopenhauer and Freud is his analysis of The Ring of the Nibelung, Tristan und Isolde, Die Meistersingers and Parsifal.
Not for nothing, they said, did Powell refer to authorities who wrote in dead languages and believed forgotten myths; not for nothing did he choose, when invited onto BBC radio's "Desert Island Discs," only episodes from the Ring of the Nibelung of Richard Wagner.
Also feeding into the Lord Of The Rings was the German Nibelungenlied, written by an anonymous poet around 1200, that would also be the inspiration for Wagner's The Ring Of The Nibelung.
Likewise, Holst would have been wary of comparisons of his joyous dance-like Jupiter with the arrogantly heroic Wotan, king of the Norse gods, as portrayed in Wagner's epic four-opera cycle The Ring of the Nibelung.
A native of Wallasey, England, the diva first garnered raves onstage in 1970 as Brunnhilde in "Die Walkure," one of the four operas in "The Ring of the Nibelung.