risperidone

(redirected from Risperdal)
Also found in: Medical.

ris·per·i·done

 (rĭ-spĕr′ə-dōn′)
n.
An oral antipsychotic drug, C28H27FN4O2, that is a dopamine and serotonin antagonist and is used to treat schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

[Perhaps (fluo)r(obenz)is(oxazole), one of its constituents (fluoro- + benz- + is(o)- + ox- + azole) + (pi)perid(ine) + -one.]
Translations

risperidone

n risperidona
References in periodicals archive ?
75 million to a young man who claimed his taking the antipsychotic drug Risperdal caused him to grow female-like breasts.
In the criminal complaint, the DOJ charged that J&J's subsidiary Janssen Pharmaceuticals marketed the atypical antipsychotic drug Risperdal to the elderly and children for off-label treatment that the U.
SeeNews) - Nov 6, 2013 - The US unit ofA Belgian Janssen Pharmaceutica will pay a USD-334-million (EUR 247m) fine to avoid prosecution for improper sales practicesA regarding antipsychoticA drug Risperdal.
1 billion after a jury found that the companies downplayed and hid risks associated with taking the antipsychotic drug Risperdal.
The Department of Justice has rejected a proposed $1 billion settlement from Johnson & Johnson on allegations of false advertising of the antipsychotic drug Risperdal and the schizophrenia treatment Invega.
A district judge has ruled the Texas Attorney General's Office may continue its legal challenge against the drug company Janssen over its schizophrenia drug Risperdal.
Johnson & Johnson (New Brunswick NJ) lost a huge jury verdict in Louisiana for making misleading claims about the safety of the company's Risperdal antipsychotic drug.
Better Tolerated Than, Risperdal For the Treatment of Schizophrenia
Coadministration with carbamazepine and other enzyme inducers such as rifampin can reduce Risperdal plasma levels, and may reduce efficacy.
announced that its antipsychotic drug Risperdal (risperidone) might cause stroke or transient ischemic attack (a temporary reduction of blood flow to the head), among other adverse cerebrovascular effects.
He describes his initial diagnosis at age 14, the subsequent withdrawal of support by his family, the nature of the voices continually prodding him to take his own life, his life on the streets, his experiences with the "revolving doors" of our mental health system, his personal haven in books and libraries, and his struggle with medication until "the day the voices stopped," when he was finally stabilized on Risperdal, one of the new generation of drugs called atypical anti-psychotic medications.