risus sardonicus

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risus sardonicus

(ˈriːsəs sɑːˈdɒnɪkəs)
n
(Pathology) pathol fixed contraction of the facial muscles resulting in a peculiar distorted grin, caused esp by tetanus. Also called: trismus cynicus
[C17: New Latin, literally: sardonic laugh]
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In shattering the novel form (and perhaps its readers' nerves), Watt shatters the conventions of language use, leaving a "mirthless" laughter in its wake-what Arsene calls "the laugh of laughs, the risus purus, the laugh laughing at the laugh, the beholding, the saluting of the highest joke, in a word the laugh that laughs-silence please-at that which is unhappy" (W 48).
The aim of our research was to study the chemical composition and antioxidant power of six table grape collected on the territory of the Russian Federation in the city of Pyatigorsk: Risus, Saperavi, Levokumsky, Gurzufsky pink, Rkatsiteli, Moldova [6].
It is the laugh of laughs, the risus purus, the laugh laughing at the laugh, the beholding, the saluting of the highest joke, in a word the laugh that laughs--silence please--at that which is unhappy.
In book 2, Lucius' fevered, magical imagination has him seeing statues come to life and hearing walls speaking; elsewhere Lucius himself figuratively becomes a statue for the communal gaze at both the Risus and Isiac festivals.
Goodman/Constantin Films 2008 Hansen/Geisler 2009 Shade/Gorman 2010 Fiat Risus (R.
Innovation project management: a research agenda, RISUS Journal on Innovation and Sustainability, v.
2, 8, de passere Silviae Quot fletus moriens Catullianus, Tot risus habeat, iocos, cachinnos Vivens passerulus meae puellae.
The dianoetic laugh, in Arsene's words, is the "laugh of laughs, the risus purus," (47), which risibility resists earthly miseries.
Polyacetylenes from Sardinian Oenanthe fistulosa: A molecular clue to risus sardonicus.
Es este un excelente analisis de como el humor puede ayudar a disipar los limites entre lo sagrado y lo profano, y de como ese risus post luctum (la risa tras la angustia) con el que el autor comienza este estudio provee un particular espacio publico para que lo sagrado rebase sus propias limitaciones.
En la Edad Media, estos rituales sobre animales del bestiario estaban enmarcados en el risus paschalis y eran a menudo estimulados por los goliardos.