robber baron

(redirected from Robber-baron)

robber baron

n.
1. One of the American industrial or financial magnates of the late 1800s who became wealthy by unethical means, such as questionable stock-market operations and exploitation of labor.
2. A feudal lord who robbed travelers passing through his domain.

robber baron

n
(Commerce) a person who has made a very large amount of money and has been prepared to act illegally or in an immoral way in order to do so.

rob′ber bar`on


n.
1. a U.S. capitalist of the late 19th century who became wealthy by ruthless and unethical means.
2. a feudal noble who robbed travelers passing through his lands.
[1875–80]
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References in classic literature ?
The world passed at a stride from a unity and simplicity broader than that of the Roman Empire at its best, to as social fragmentation as complete as the robber-baron period of the Middle Ages.
And that was a day of romance; If those robber-barons were somewhat grim and drunken ogres, they had a certain grandeur of the wild beast in them,--they were forest boars with tusks, tearing and rending, not the ordinary domestic grunter; they represented the demon forces forever in collision with beauty, virtue, and the gentle uses of life; they made a fine contrast in the picture with the wandering minstrel, the soft-lipped princess, the pious recluse, and the timid Israelite.
Williams knew what we--in our sentimental and fraudulent retelling of our nation's founding story--usually omit: That the impulse for religious freedom was being hijacked by robber-baron forces.
But hold on; the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth (also known by the unfortunate acronym MAMFW, or "mam-fwuh") was founded as the Fort Worth Public Library and Art Gallery way back in 1892, decades before many larger cities got their own robber-baron palaces turned public showplaces.
This would include monopoly, collusion, price fixing and other robber-baron tactics.
With true robber-baron panache, the monstrous magnate uses his newfound wealth to benefit humanity, founding a new New York opera house to rival the Metropolitan.
The carriage has been kept in immaculate condition, with a table-setting in the dining car showing his taste for fine silver, crystal, decanters and his own bone china dinner service - in short, the style that every robber-baron plutocrat of his day aspired to