Bresson

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Bresson

(French brɛsɔ̃)
n
(Biography) Robert (rɔbɛr). 1901–99, French film director: his films include Le Journal d'un curé de campagne (1950), Une Femme douce (1969), and L'Argent (1983)
References in periodicals archive ?
As a war movie, it's like smaller, more character-driven films, such as the 1956 Robert Bresson film A Man Escaped, or the 1938 Jean Renoir film La Grande Illusion.
NOTES ON THE CINEMATOGRAPH BY ROBERT BRESSON, TRANSLATED FROM FRENCH BY JONATHAN GRIFFIN newyork: new york review books.
Desde Cero en conducta de 1932, en la que el gran Jean Vigo se sumerge como nunca antes en la sensibilidad de los ninos, hasta la ultima de la lista, Pickpocket de Robert Bresson, cuyo carterista sin alma bien podria ser el adulto en que se convirtio alguno de los ninos humillados de Vigo.
Plusieurs films entrant dans cette categorie et ayant marque le cinema international seront presentes durant cette manifestation dont [beaucoup moins que] L'argent [beaucoup plus grand que] (1983) du realisateur francais Robert Bresson, [beaucoup moins que] Harlan Cointy USA [beaucoup plus grand que] (1976) de l'Americaine Barbara Cobel, [beaucoup moins que] Ugetsu Monogatari [beaucoup plus grand que] (1953) du realisateur japonais Kenji Mizojusci, et [beaucoup moins que] Panique [beaucoup plus grand que] (1947) du realisateur francais Julien Duvivier.
UN CONDENADO A MUERTE SE HA ESCAPADO DE ROBERT BRESSON (1956)
Extensively detailing the historical continuities between slow movies and films, from Michelangelo Antonioni, Robert Bresson and Alexander Sokurov among others, creates the book's case for the formal and ideological identity of slow movies across national boundaries.
De hecho, el texto de Barthes esta describiendo el argumento del filme Les anges du peche del cineasta Robert Bresson.
Paul Schrader, for instance, in discussing the style of film-making he characterizes as transcendental, privileges the following: a lack of external ostentation (no lightning bolts carving out the 10 commandments, no grand dances or orgiastic scenes in Herod's palace); a general nonexpressiveness (no looks of shock or awe or quivering lips connoting being touched by the divine); and a shunning of what director Robert Bresson called "screens" (clues that inform a viewer what to inspect or how to feel) (1972, p.
Few words are used, as he relies more on facial expressions and space to tell his story, in the filmmaking tradition of Carl Dreyer or Robert Bresson.
Organized by the Cineforum Robert Bresson and Fondazione Palazzo Magnani, this fest offers "a selection of the best films from several Far East countries," according to its website.
The film, directed by Robert Bresson, premiered at the 1966 Venice Film Festival, where it won the OCIC Award.