Henryson

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Henryson

(ˈhɛnrɪsən)
n
(Biography) Robert. ?1430–?1506, Scottish poet. His works include Testament of Cresseid (1593), a sequel to Chaucer's Troilus and Cressida, the 13 Moral Fables of Esope the Phrygian, and the pastoral dialogue Robene and Makyne
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This impressive record is unequalled by any other Older Scots poet and certainly not by Robert Henryson, William Dunbar or Gavin Douglas, to name the makaris most esteemed today.
1) The poem centres on Troilus, his death and ascent to the eighth sphere, but Criseyde, according to some critics, "lacks an apocalyptic ending"--an ending that she would be assigned by Robert Henryson in his famous Testament of Cresseid (Higl 2010: 175).
The Story of Troilus as Told by Benoit de Sainte- Maure, Giovanni Boccaccio, Geoffrey Chaucer, Robert Henryson.
The topics include a historical study of voice onset time in received pronunciation, the origin and function of the grapheme combination qu in English, words denoting kingdom in Layamon's Brut, female animals in fables by Robert Henryson and Biernat of Lublin, a synopsis of the main approaches to semantic change in linguistics through the 19th and 20th centuries, and the linguistic situation in Kenya according to Labov's social factors.
Although Scotland lacked a printing press until relatively late, the period itself saw a major literary flowering under the Renaissance king James IV, with the poetry of poets such as Robert Henryson, William Dunbar and Gavin Douglas among its greatest achievements.
Many notable authors of medieval Britain--John Gower, William Langland, Robert Henryson, Thomas Hoccleve--are mentioned only in passing, if at all.
From Westminster School, he advanced to Brasenose College, Oxford, where he graduated with a first class honours degree in English to which he added a DPhil for his study of Robert Henryson, the medieval Scottish poet celebrated for his version of Aesop's Fables and The Testament of Cresseid, a sequel to Chaucer's Troilus and Crysede.
Complete and Full with Numbers: The Narrative Poetry of Robert Henryson.
For a longer consideration of fables and their role as medieval cultural referents, see Douglas Gray, Robert Henryson, Medieval and Renaissance Authors (Leiden: Brill, 1979), pp.
El capitulo se cierra con cuatro paginas dedicadas a John Gower, John Lydgate y los Scottish Chaucerians, Robert Henryson y William Dunbar.
How about, instead, more than sixty essaylike stories-with titles like "'Not as I suld, I wrait, but as I couth': Robert Henryson, William Dunbar, Gavin Douglas, Stephen Hawes" and "'Arranging, deepening, enchanting': Wallace Stevens, Marianne Moore, Elizabeth Bishop, John Ashbery, Amy Clampitt, Sharon Olds, Mark Doty"?