rojak


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rojak

(ˈrodʒak)
n
(Cookery) (in Malaysia) a salad dish served in chilli sauce
[from Malay]
References in periodicals archive ?
Street food like rojak, a fruit salad with a tangy sweet shrimp sauce, or assam laksa and chee cheong fun that are heavily dependent on the strong flavour of Penang-made heh koe and belacan, two shrimp pastes of different consistencies and tastes, highlight an interdependent relationship between locally manufactured ingredients and hawkers.
The Rojak Puff and Chwee Kueh that served as the amuse bouche immediately transported guests to Singapore.
After all, only here can one find rojak, nasi lemak, and the exotically named bubur-cha-cha.
My belief that [Mailer's visit] was the genesis of Mailer's Vietnam novel causes me to wonder how Stephen Rojak.
precision of opinion mining of web messages of the language called Rojak.
Malaysian Muslims break their fast at home with delicacies -- from rojak ( prawn and coconut fritters) to murtabak ( very similar to the Bengali Mughlai parota) -- they pick up from Ramadan bazrs that sprout across this ethnically diverse country, where it's not unusual for families to have members of different communities happily married to each other, and celebrating with equal fanfare the major festivals of each religion.
Featuring international superstars such as Pitbull, Taboo (Black Eyed Peas), DJ Antoine, Tomcraft, Style Of Eye, Zombie Kids, Mikkas, Inna and Tenashar as well as national hopefuls and local heroes such as Mizz Nina, Stacy Angie, Joe Flizzow, Pop Shuvit and Rojak Bois, 2Spicy Entertainment is expecting more attendees than their first "We Love Asia" festival in January.
A Rojak or oxtail soup index lacks the universality, as such cuisine may not be available or in demand outside of Malaysia, Singapore and Indonesia.
There are a variety of food sold namely laksa, sticky rice cendol, noodle soup, rojak and many more with a variety of drinks.
Over three dozen hand-picked street food vendors from all over the world will serve up everything from Rojak to Laksa.
Ridwan Effendy and Abdul Rojak (Ujung Pandang: Intisari and Dewan Kesenian Sulawesi Selatan, 1999), p.
And this gets to the heartburn of the matter: to my taste cheese on seafood tastes like rojak on roadkill, but many a restaurant-goer might think it's a good idea or--horror of horrors--like it.