Roman law


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Roman law

n.
1. The legal system of ancient Rome, which influenced modern Western legal systems.
2. The civil law compiled by the emperor Justinian, which remains a source for modern European law.

Roman law

n
1. (Law) the system of jurisprudence of ancient Rome, codified under Justinian and forming the basis of many modern legal systems
2. (Law) another term for civil law

Ro′man law′


n.
the system of jurisprudence elaborated by the ancient Romans, a strong and varied influence on the legal systems of many countries.
[1650–60]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Roman law - the legal code of ancient RomeRoman law - the legal code of ancient Rome; codified under Justinian; the basis for many modern systems of civil law
addiction - (Roman law) a formal award by a magistrate of a thing or person to another person (as the award of a debtor to his creditor); a surrender to a master; "under Roman law addiction was the justification for slavery"
legal code - a code of laws adopted by a state or nation; "a code of laws"
novate - replace with something new, especially an old obligation by a new one
stipulate - make an oral contract or agreement in the verbal form of question and answer that is necessary to give it legal force
References in classic literature ?
In the meanwhile," continued the magistrate, "our codes are in full force, with all their contradictory enactments derived from Gallic customs, Roman laws, and Frank usages; the knowledge of all which, you will agree, is not to be acquired without extended labor; it needs tedious study to acquire this knowledge, and, when acquired, a strong power of brain to retain it.
If applied, the doctrine - which harkens back to Roman law - would have far reaching implications: in denying an industry's legal standing to trade, it gives authorities more leeway to impose restrictions.
He said: Europe is based on Christian civilisation, and Christianity built the cathedral of European civilisation from Jewish ethics, Greek culture, Germanic state organisation and Roman law.
Historians and classicists from the US address the economic aspects of law and legal institutions, the efficiency of law in deterring harmful behavior, the relationship between local provincial law and Roman law in the Roman Empire, concepts of justice in provincial Roman society, how Roman legal rules are embedded in social values, the role of political forces in shaping legislation in the Roman Empire, and the usefulness of law and legal institutions for various levels in Roman society.
Taking its cue from the tribunal's previous actions in creating the writ of amparo and the writ of habeas data, Centerlaw said the new judicial order may be called the 'writ contra homo sacer,' a legal principle based on an ancient Roman law.
Ioan Peretz, in his course on the history of Romanian law, presents in the first part the norms of classical Roman law on the ground that they are "the Roman stock of our law".
The legal and social legacy of Roman law facilitated the incorporation of African-descended people into Latin American societies and allowed for limited social mobility in ways that were impossible in the United States prior to 1960.
Bethlehem was busy as people went around, about their business with bustling sound, many strangers there so to Jerusalem they could go, to fill in the census and obey the Roman law.
The VOC had to turn to Roman law to find some guidance as to rules concerning possession, sale, treatment, and emancipation.
The Scholars of the Universities on the Continent played a similarly creative role in transforming the Roman law of the Digest into the Ius Commune of Europe.
Indeed, Leoni uses the Roman law made by the jurisconsults and English common law essentially interchangeably as an analytical matter, so that the structure he uses in describing Roman law developed by the jurisconsult is essentially the same one that Hayek later identifies as distinctive in the common-law process under the English common law.
Drawing on Roman law, under the patronage of the papacy, canon lawyers, in university settings such as Bologna, Padua, Paris, and Oxford, from the late eleventh century began to create a system of law for Christians founded on the assumption of moral equality.