romanticism

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ro·man·ti·cism

 (rō-măn′tĭ-sĭz′əm)
n.
1. often Romanticism An artistic and intellectual movement originating in Europe in the late 1700s and characterized by a heightened interest in nature, emphasis on the individual's expression of emotion and imagination, departure from the attitudes and forms of classicism, and rebellion against established social rules and conventions.
2. Romantic quality or spirit in thought, expression, or action.

ro·man′ti·cist n.

romanticism

(rəʊˈmæntɪˌsɪzəm)
n
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) (often capital) the theory, practice, and style of the romantic art, music, and literature of the late 18th and early 19th centuries, usually opposed to classicism
2. (Art Terms) (often capital) the theory, practice, and style of the romantic art, music, and literature of the late 18th and early 19th centuries, usually opposed to classicism
3. (Classical Music) (often capital) the theory, practice, and style of the romantic art, music, and literature of the late 18th and early 19th centuries, usually opposed to classicism
4. romantic attitudes, ideals, or qualities
roˈmanticist n

ro•man•ti•cism

(roʊˈmæn təˌsɪz əm)

n.
1. romantic spirit or tendency.
2. (often cap.) the Romantic style or movement in literature and art, or adherence to its principles.
[1795–1805]
ro•man′ti•cist, n.

Romanticism

the reflection, in art, of a late 18th-century literary and philosophical movement in reaction against the intellectuality and rationality of Neo-Classicism. It produced no single artistic style or characteristic but strongly influenced the ideals of imagination, emotion, and the freedom of expression in other media. — Romanticist, n.
See also: Art

romanticism

1. A movement in European music of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, based on a revolt against classicism in favor of more imaginative, free, and picturesque modes and subject matter. It is characterized by the expression of emotions and interest in the sublime, as often represented by nature, and the exotic. It paralleled the Romantic movement in literature, from which it often borrowed themes and subjects.
2. (c 1780–1850) A mainly literary movement, romanticism was a reaction against neo-classical principles and the Industrial Revolution. Deriving inspiration from untamed nature, romanticism centered on the importance of individual feeling towards the natural world.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.romanticism - impractical romantic ideals and attitudesromanticism - impractical romantic ideals and attitudes
idealism - impracticality by virtue of thinking of things in their ideal form rather than as they really are
2.Romanticism - a movement in literature and art during the late 18th and early 19th centuries that celebrated nature rather than civilization; "Romanticism valued imagination and emotion over rationality"
artistic style, idiom - the style of a particular artist or school or movement; "an imaginative orchestral idiom"
arts, humanistic discipline, humanities, liberal arts - studies intended to provide general knowledge and intellectual skills (rather than occupational or professional skills); "the college of arts and sciences"
classicalism, classicism - a movement in literature and art during the 17th and 18th centuries in Europe that favored rationality and restraint and strict forms; "classicism often derived its models from the ancient Greeks and Romans"
3.romanticism - an exciting and mysterious quality (as of a heroic time or adventure)
quality - an essential and distinguishing attribute of something or someone; "the quality of mercy is not strained"--Shakespeare
stardust - a dreamy romantic or sentimental quality
Translations
romantičnostromantizam
ロマン主義

romanticism

[rəʊˈmæntɪsɪzəm] Nromanticismo m

romanticism

Romanticism [rəʊˈmæntɪsɪzəm] nromantisme m

romanticism

n (Art, Liter, Mus: also Romanticism) → Romantik f; his romanticismsein romantisches Wesen

romanticism

[rəʊˈmæntɪˌsɪzm] n (Art) → romanticismo
References in classic literature ?
The appeal to antiquity is fatal to us who are romanticists.
That was left for the romanticists of our own century to discover; even the romanticists whom Goldoni drove from the stage, were of that simpler eighteenth-century sort who had not yet liberated the individual from society, but held him accountable in the old way.
The same passionate appreciation extends with the Romanticists to all full and rich beauty and everything grand and heroic.
In it he employs Spenser's stanza, with real skill, but in a half-jesting fashion which the later eighteenth-century Romanticists also seem to have thought necessary when they adopted it, apparently as a sort of apology for reviving so old-fashioned a form.
Critics of literary history have again [96] and again remarked upon it; it is a characteristic which reveals itself in many different forms, but is strongest and most sympathetic in what is strongest and most serious in modern literature; it is exemplified by writers as unlike Wordsworth as the French romanticist poets.
I am quite sure, Prince," she said, "that you are a romanticist.
Idealist and romanticist that I was and always had been in spite of my analytical nature, yet I had failed till now in grasping much of the physical characteristics of love.
BALTHAZAR KING can break the hearts of sporting romanticists everywhere by winning the Crabbie's Grand National at Aintree.
As tantalizing as this may sound for Romanticists and literary historians, it is not D'Arcy Wood's intention to explore the implications of Tambora for, and in the work of, the Shelleys and Byron despite occasionally brief-and for this reader, often glancing and cursory--readings that pop up ("Darkness," 66-69; The Last Man, 95-96; "Mont Blanc," Frankenstein, 151-57).
The beasts, some more tame than others, recall the dynamic horses in the work of the French Romanticists Eugene Delacroix and Theodore Gericault.
Regarded by the romanticists as a part of a universe, man was no longer looked upon as individualistic, as isolated; he had now become a member of the cosmic commonwealth.
There are whole-earth people, survivalists, romanticists, environmentalists, and even collective communes.