Rome


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Related to Rome: Roman Empire, Ancient Rome

Rome 1

 (rōm)
1. The capital and largest city of Italy, in the west-central part of the country on the Tiber River. Traditionally founded by Romulus in 753 bc, it was ruled first by Etruscans, who were overthrown c. 500 bc. The Roman Republic gradually extended its territory and expanded its influence, giving way to the Roman Empire during the reign of Augustus (27 bc-ad 14). As capital of the empire, Rome was considered the center of the known world, but the city declined when Constantine transferred his capital to Byzantium (c. 330). Alaric I conquered the city in 410, leading to a lengthy period of devastation by Germanic tribes. In the Middle Ages the city revived as the spiritual and temporal power of the papacy increased. During the 1800s Rome was held at various times by the French until it became the capital of Italy in 1871. Vatican City remains an independent enclave within the confines of Rome.
2. A city of central New York on the Mohawk River west-northwest of Utica. Because of its location as a portage point, the city was strategically important during the French and Indian Wars and the American Revolution.

Rome 2

 (rōm)
n.
A variety of apple having round firm fruit with tough red skin.

[After Rome Township, Ohio, where it was discovered.]

Rome

(rəʊm)
n
1. (Placename) the capital of Italy, on the River Tiber: includes the independent state of the Vatican City; traditionally founded by Romulus on the Palatine Hill in 753 bc, later spreading to six other hills east of the Tiber; capital of the Roman Empire; a great cultural and artistic centre, esp during the Renaissance. Pop: 2 546 804 (2001). Italian name: Roma
2. (Historical Terms) the Roman Empire
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the Roman Empire
4. (Roman Catholic Church) the Roman Catholic Church or Roman Catholicism

Rome

(roʊm)

n.
1. Italian, Roma. the capital of Italy, in the central part, on the Tiber: site of Vatican City. 2,817,227.
2. the ancient Italian kingdom, republic, and empire whose capital was the city of Rome.
3. the Roman Catholic Church.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Rome - capital and largest city of ItalyRome - capital and largest city of Italy; on the Tiber; seat of the Roman Catholic Church; formerly the capital of the Roman Republic and the Roman Empire
lustrum - a ceremonial purification of the Roman population every five years following the census
catacomb - an underground tunnel with recesses where bodies were buried (as in ancient Rome)
circus - (antiquity) an open-air stadium for chariot races and gladiatorial games
Amphitheatrum Flavium, Colosseum - a large amphitheater in Rome whose construction was begun by Vespasian about AD 75 or 80
pantheon - (antiquity) a temple to all the gods
Sistine Chapel - the private chapel of the popes in Rome; it was built by and named after Sixtus IV in 1473
toga virilis - (ancient Rome) a toga worn by a youth as a symbol of manhood and citizenship
Seven Hills of Rome - the hills on which the ancient city of Rome was built
Italia, Italian Republic, Italy - a republic in southern Europe on the Italian Peninsula; was the core of the Roman Republic and the Roman Empire between the 4th century BC and the 5th century AD
Lateran - the site in Rome containing the church of Rome and the Lateran Palace
Holy See, State of the Vatican City, The Holy See - the smallest sovereign state in the world; the see of the Pope (as the Bishop of Rome); home of the Pope and the central administration of the Roman Catholic Church; achieved independence from Italy in 1929
Bacchus - (classical mythology) god of wine; equivalent of Dionysus
Roman - a resident of modern Rome
augur, auspex - (ancient Rome) a religious official who interpreted omens to guide public policy
centurion - (ancient Rome) the leader of 100 soldiers
gladiator - (ancient Rome) a professional combatant or a captive who entertained the public by engaging in mortal combat
pontifex - a member of the highest council of priests in ancient Rome
procurator - (ancient Rome) someone employed by the Roman Emperor to manage finance and taxes
sibyl - (ancient Rome) a woman who was regarded as an oracle or prophet
tribune - (ancient Rome) an official elected by the plebeians to protect their interests
Romanic, Roman - of or relating to or derived from Rome (especially ancient Rome); "Roman architecture"; "the old Roman wall"
2.Rome - the leadership of the Roman Catholic Church
Church of Rome, Roman Catholic Church, Roman Church, Western Church, Roman Catholic - the Christian Church based in the Vatican and presided over by a pope and an episcopal hierarchy
leaders, leadership - the body of people who lead a group; "the national leadership adopted his plan"

Rome

The seven hills of rome

Aventine, Caelian, Capitoline, Esquiline, Palatine, Quirinal, Viminal
Translations
Řím
Rom
Rooma
Rooma
Róma
Róm
Roma
Rim

Rome

[rəʊm] N
1.Roma f
all roads lead to Rometodos los caminos llevan a Roma
Rome was not built in a dayno se ganó Zamora en una hora
when in Rome (do as the Romans do)donde fueres, haz lo que vieres
2. (Rel) → la Iglesia, el catolicismo
Manning turned to RomeManning se convirtió al catolicismo

Rome

[ˈrəʊm] nRome
in Rome → à Rome
to Rome → à Rome

Rome

nRom nt; when in Rome (do as the Romans do) (prov) → ˜ andere Länder, andere Sitten (Prov); Rome wasn’t built in a day (Prov) → Rom ist auch nicht an einem Tag erbaut worden (Prov); all roads lead to Rome (Prov) → viele Wege führen nach Rom (prov); the Church of Romedie römische Kirche

Rome

[rəʊm] nRoma f
the Church of Rome → la Chiesa Romana
when in Rome (do as the Romans do) → paese che vai usanze che trovi
References in classic literature ?
I hope I shall go abroad some day, but I'd rather go to Rome than the row," said Amy, who had not the remotest idea what the Row was and wouldn't have asked for the world.
On the blank wall at my left the dark, old-fashioned wall-paper was covered by a large map of ancient Rome, the work of some German scholar.
I've bin kalklatin'," said Dick Mattingly, leaning on his long- handled shovel with lazy gravity, "that when I go to Rome this winter, I'll get one o' them marble sharps to chisel me a statoo o' some kind to set up on the spot where we made our big strike.
His inward trouble drove him to practices more in accordance with the old, corrupted faith of Rome than with the better light of the church in which he had been born and bred.
All roads lead to Rome, and there were times when it might have struck us that almost every branch of study or subject of conversation skirted forbidden ground.
The sheeted dead Did squeak and gibber in the streets of Rome.
The civilized nations--Greece, Rome, England--have been sustained by the primitive forests which anciently rotted where they stand.
In Rome, along at first, you are full of regrets that Michelangelo died; but by and by, you only regret that you didn't see him do it.
That drop was falling when the Pyramids were new; when Troy fell; when the foundations of Rome were laid when Christ was crucified; when the Conqueror created the British empire; when Columbus sailed; when the massacre at Lexington was "news.
Rebecca's visit to Milltown was all that her glowing fancy had painted it, except that recent readings about Rome and Venice disposed her to believe that those cities might have an advantage over Milltown in the matter of mere pictorial beauty.
I had read Goldsmith's History of Rome, and had formed my opinion of Nero, Caligula, &c.
That, if statues were decreed in Britain, as in ancient Greece and Rome, to public benefactors, this shining citizen would assuredly have had one.