Roth IRA

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Related to Roth Individual Retirement Account: Investment Retirement Account

Roth IRA

 (ī′är-ā′)
n.
A modified individual retirement account in which a person can set aside after-tax income up to a specified amount each year. Earnings on the account are tax-free, and tax-free withdrawals may be made after age 59 1/2 .

[After William Victor Roth, Jr. (1921-2003), US congressman.]

Roth IRA


n.
an individual retirement account in which investments are made with taxable dollars, but withdrawals are tax-free after age 59 1/2.
[1997; after William V. Roth, Jr., senator from Delaware]
References in periodicals archive ?
A report from NerdWallet argues that, for most savers, at largely all income levels, utilizing a Roth individual retirement account (IRA) can generate significantly more retirement wealth compared with a traditional IRA.
His captivation became manifest when he started a Roth Individual Retirement Account as a 16-year-old.
The myRA will be offered via a Roth individual retirement account where savers will benefit from principal protection, so the account balance will never go down in value, according to a brief on the White House's website.
In light of continued volatility in the markets and the recent expansion of the scope of Roth individual retirement account (IRA) conversions under the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 (ATRA), some taxpayers might be reconsidering the decision to complete a Roth conversion during 2013 and pay taxes owed.
Nearly one in three government-sponsored defined contribution plans feature a Roth individual retirement account and 10 percent boast in-service Roth conversions, but less than 5 percent of plan participants contribute to a Roth account, new research shows.
If you have not already put money into your traditional or ROTH Individual Retirement Account for 2011, you have until April 17 to do it.
For 2011, the maximum Roth Individual Retirement Account contribution remains at $5,000 ($6,000 for individuals age 50 or older).
According to the EGTRRA conference report, Congress wanted to give retirement plan participants the kind of choice individuals already had to decide between deductible and Roth individual retirement account contributions.
Each year, your child can put as much as $3,000 (for 2002) of his or her wages into a regular or a Roth Individual Retirement Account (IRA).
Most notably, the 1997 Tax Relief Act created the Roth individual retirement account, through which aftertax contributions are accumulated and can be withdrawn tax-free at retirement age.
By using the NEA Valuebuilder Mutual Fund Program to invest in a Roth Individual Retirement Account (IRA), you can contribute up to $2,000(*) a year.
Not content with the initial Roth Individual Retirement Account provisions enacted in the Taxpayer Relief Act of 1997, Congress has significantly fine tuned the rules for this astoundingly popular tax-saving device.