rotoscope

(redirected from Rotoscoped)
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Related to Rotoscoped: Rotoscopy

rotoscope

(ˈrəʊtəˌskəʊp)
n
a projection device that allows images from live-action films to be traced to create an animated sequence
vb
(tr) to create (the outline of an object) for manipulation in an animated film sequence
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References in periodicals archive ?
Created on an Apple II by Jordan Mechner in his Yale dorm room, Karateka became a #1 bestseller and influenced a generation of gamers with its groundbreaking rotoscoped animation and cinematic cutscenes.
The cut scenes are stylish; a mix of live action and CGI, heavily rotoscoped with leached colours, often in black and white.
The image feed appears rotoscoped (resembling the work of Kota Ezawa) and toned in contrasting red and blue, and on the roadways depicted, the lanes are nearly empty, seemingly existing out of any normal time.
Wells' futuristic vision Things to Come (1936); and flying robots lifted directly from the Superman cartoon Mechanical Monsters (1941), itself an effective stylistic combination of rotoscoped live-action with animation.
Directed by Brett Morgen and animated in the rotoscoped style of Waking Life, this heavily re-created documentary tells the story of Abbie Hoffman (voiced by Hank Azaria) and his fellow counterculture revolutionaries as they go on trial following riots outside the 1968 Democratic convention.
At least there's more action here than in that rotoscoped misfire.
Filming was great fun, but I had to stand in a pink bodystocking when I was rotoscoped for the film.
38) To create a rotoscoped cartoon character the Fleischers first shot a normal film strip of a body in motion.
Instead of using traditional cel animation or high-tech CGI, Cuppa Coffee works with everything from puppets and clay figures to live-action footage to rotoscoped scratching on film.
When they shot the plate they weren't able to get the real ride out of the way, so we went in and rotoscoped the ride out, then painted everything back that you would see if the car wasn't there -- including the platform and the background and a little cabin with Christmas lights.
The film looks as if it were rotoscoped (a process in which drawings are traced over live-action footage, as in Richard Linklater's similarly deranged Scanner Darkly [2006]), but Folman and his animation team, the Bridgit Folman Film Gang, in fact, employed a combination of Flash, 3-D, and classic animation techniques.