Rottweiler

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Rott·wei·ler

 (rŏt′wī′lər, rôt′-)
n.
A dog of a large breed developed in Germany, having a muscular body, a broad head, and a short black coat with tan markings on the face and legs.

[German, after Rottweil, a city of southern Germany.]

Rottweiler

(ˈrɒtˌvaɪlə)
n
1. (Breeds) a breed of large robustly built dog with a smooth coat of black with dark tan markings on the face, chest, and legs. It was previously a docked breed
2. (often not capital) an aggressive, ruthless, and unscrupulous person
[German, named after Rottweil, German city where the dog was originally bred]

Rott•wei•ler

(ˈrɒt waɪ lər)

n.
one of a German breed of large, powerful dogs having a short, coarse black coat with tan markings.
[1905–10; < German, after Rottweil city in SW Germany; see -er1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Rottweiler - German breed of large vigorous short-haired cattle dogsRottweiler - German breed of large vigorous short-haired cattle dogs
sheep dog, sheepdog, shepherd dog - any of various usually long-haired breeds of dog reared to herd and guard sheep
Translations
rottweiler
rotveileris

Rottweiler

[ˈrɒtˌvaɪləʳ] NRottweiler m

Rottweiler

[ˈrɒtvaɪlər] rottweiler (British) nRottweiler m
References in periodicals archive ?
Often, my husband and I looked at one another as we sat on the floor eating our food on a tray while every settee had a rottie sleeping on it
the representative of the Rottie rescue, we recognised a fellow "people optional" soul.
Perhaps your neighbor's Rottie is leaning against you in what seems like a friendly manner.
It was reported that he can be a little unsure with new people but it soon became clear that he is simply very typical of his breed and is a smart rottie who just likes to take stock of you.
Dogs Trust vet Ariel Brunn said: "He may have inherited more of the Rottie genes from his parents.
Mine aren''t nasty and my rottie was attacked by two Jack Russells whilst on the lead.
Both of them were pretty good at alerting us to what they considered "danger," although our half Rottie felt it was a human's job to actually check out the odd noise or three.
It wasn't the Rottie," he said, looking up, and I couldn't tell whether or not he liked what I'd done to the ceiling.