roundedness

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round·ed

 (roun′dĭd)
adj.
1. Shaped into the form of a circle or sphere; made round.
2. Linguistics Pronounced with the lips pursed or shaped in a round form.
3. Complete; balanced: a rounded meal.

round′ed·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.roundedness - the property possessed by a rounded convexity
convexity, convexness - the property possessed by a convex shape
ellipticity, oblateness - the property possessed by a round shape that is flattened at the poles; "the oblateness of the planet"
References in periodicals archive ?
bodega catechism be a rounded vowel sound echoed off a known mattress a
minuscule / Realized as a front, unrounded vowel just below the half-open position in RP as in 'man': /m minuscule n // / Realized as a centralized, back rounded vowel in RP e.
We hypothesized that a smooth beverage (chocolate milk) would affect matches to a nonrounded vowel and that a tart beverage (cranberry juice) would affect matches to the rounded vowel depending on the visual stimulus that was likely in short-term memory, or what we term as visual recency.
The pattern that this study established concerning vowel coalescence is that when the basic front high unrounded vowel /i/ is preceded by the basic low central vowel /a/ [e] is formed and when the basic back high rounded vowel /u/ is preceded by the basic low central vowel /a/ [o] is formed.
Although a similar front rounded vowel is also found in other varieties of Scots, this vowel is traditionally held, by Shetlanders as well as researchers of Shetland dialect, to be a preserved Norn feature, and is indeed typically found in Scandinavian-based vocabulary, such as troni 'pig's snout'and lof 'palm of the hand', but also in more modern words, e.
He's got teeth that could unhusk a coconut, an inability to formulate a rounded vowel and talent that couldn't be located by the Hubble telescope.
On the next page the author gives examples from speech errors from English that are intended to illustrate that segments can be transposed, but one of the symbols used, namely the North American symbol for the palatal glide [y], is introduced in the IPA chart on the opposite page as the close front rounded vowel.
If we look at the pronunciation of Judeo-Ferrarese or Judeo-Mantuan, for example, we do not find the front rounded vowel u, despite the fact that u exists in the local speech of Mantua and Ferrara just as it does in Turin.
In his speech, vowels in blue, boots and shoes are slightly to the front of the central region, the last of these producing the auditory impression of a front rounded vowel with the quality [i].
He could prolong the rounded vowel of oy, or let it ricochet like an echo, as if he were shouting in a tunnel or a cave.
Early eo spellings may well indicate that the second element of the short diphthong was originally rounded, but there is no reliable evidence that that element was high and rounded; indeed the presence of a high rounded vowel would be difficult to explain on phonological grounds.
This is a back, long and rounded vowel as found in words such as soR `put in something by force', doR `race' and boR `mouth'.