roundhouse

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round·house

 (round′hous′)
n.
1. A usually circular or semicircular building constructed around a central turntable and used for housing and switching locomotives.
2. Nautical A cabin on the after part of the quarterdeck of a ship.
3. Games A meld of four kings and four queens in pinochle.
4. Sports A punch or kick delivered with a sweeping movement from one side.

roundhouse

(ˈraʊndˌhaʊs)
n
1. (Railways) a circular building in which railway locomotives are serviced or housed, radial tracks being fed by a central turntable
2. (Boxing) boxing slang
a. a swinging punch or style of punching
b. (as modifier): a roundhouse style.
3. (Card Games) pinochle US a meld of all four kings and queens
4. an obsolete word for jail
5. (Nautical Terms) obsolete a cabin on the quarterdeck of a sailing ship

round•house

(ˈraʊndˌhaʊs)

n., pl. -hous•es (-ˌhaʊ zɪz)
1. a building for the servicing and repair of locomotives, built around a turntable.
2. a cabin on the after part of a quarterdeck.
3. a punch delivered with an exaggerated circular motion.
4. a meld in pinochle of one king and queen of each suit.
[1580–90]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.roundhouse - workplace consisting of a circular building for repairing locomotivesroundhouse - workplace consisting of a circular building for repairing locomotives
workplace, work - a place where work is done; "he arrived at work early today"
2.roundhouse - a hook delivered with an exaggerated swing
hook - a short swinging punch delivered from the side with the elbow bent
Translations

roundhouse

[ˈraʊndhaʊs] N (roundhouses (pl)) [ˈraʊndhaʊzɪz]
1. (Rail) → cocherón m circular, rotonda f para locomotoras
2. (Naut) (archaic) → chupeta f
References in classic literature ?
You could set your watch by that tune as confidently as by the roundhouse whistle.
At other times anyone could dance who paid his money and was orderly; the railroad men, the roundhouse mechanics, the delivery boys, the iceman, the farm-hands who lived near enough to ride into town after their day's work was over.
To be sure, I would tell him how kindly I had myself been used upon that dry land he was so much afraid of, and how well fed and carefully taught both by my friends and my parents: and if he had been recently hurt, he would weep bitterly and swear to run away; but if he was in his usual crackbrain humour, or (still more) if he had had a glass of spirits in the roundhouse, he would deride the notion.
For a fireman he was scrupulously clean, always washing up in the roundhouse before he came home.
Finds from prehistoric roundhouses at Must Farm quarry, Whittlesey, in East Anglia, which have been dubbed the "Pompeii of the Fens", include sets of pots and Europe's finest set of fabrics from the era.
The larders, an early form of refrigeration used to keep milk and meat from going off, were uncovered by a team investigating six roundhouses found at a housing development site at Dunstaffnage, near Oban, Argyll.
It was one of a number of roundhouses and other buildings - including compost toilets, a workshop and hay barn - approved by Pembrokeshire Coast National Park Authority this week.
There are four roundhouses in the village along with a camp fire, water and wood storage areas and an area to keep sheep.
Delegates at the open day ( held on the farm of John and Nick Hodgson who own the third of the innovative new Roundhouses built by Barnard Castle-based Roundhouse Building Solutions Ltd ( heard few farm buildings provide the consistent level of ventilation necessary to ensure an airflow sufficient to maximise health and contentment.
Past monkeys in refurbished roundhouses and giraffes within moats turned into rock gardens.
Smaller roundhouses like this one were used for small families and storage.
The building, which is close to the village pub, is a modern version of the Welsh roundhouses of the Iron and Bronze ages.