utilitarianism

(redirected from Rule utilitarianism)
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u·til·i·tar·i·an·ism

 (yo͞o-tĭl′ĭ-târ′ē-ə-nĭz′əm)
n.
1. The belief that the value of a thing or an action is determined by its utility.
2. The ethical theory proposed by Jeremy Bentham and James Mill that all action should be directed toward achieving the greatest happiness for the greatest number of people.
3. The quality of being utilitarian: housing of bleak utilitarianism.

utilitarianism

(juːˌtɪlɪˈtɛərɪəˌnɪzəm)
n
1. (Philosophy) the doctrine that the morally correct course of action consists in the greatest good for the greatest number, that is, in maximizing the total benefit resulting, without regard to the distribution of benefits and burdens
2. (Philosophy) the theory that the criterion of virtue is utility

u•til•i•tar•i•an•ism

(yuˌtɪl ɪˈtɛər i əˌnɪz əm)

n.
1. the ethical doctrine that virtue is based on utility, and that conduct should be directed toward promoting the greatest happiness of the greatest number of persons.
2. utilitarian quality or character.
[1820–30]

utilitarianism

the ethical doctrine that virtue is based upon utility and that behavior should have as its goal the procurement of the greatest happiness for the greatest number of persons. — utilitarian, n., adj.
See also: Ethics
the philosophical tenets set forth by John Stuart Mill based on the principle of “the greatest good for the greatest number” and holding that the criterion of virtue lies in its utility. — utilitarian, n., adj.
See also: Philosophy

utilitarianism

A philosophical school of thought arguing that ethics must be based on whatever brings the greatest amount of good to the greatest number of people.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.utilitarianism - doctrine that the useful is the good; especially as elaborated by Jeremy Bentham and James Mill; the aim was said to be the greatest happiness for the greatest number
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school
Translations

utilitarianism

[ˌjuːtɪlɪˈtɛərɪənɪzəm] Nutilitarismo m

utilitarianism

n (Philos) → Utilitarismus m
References in periodicals archive ?
Many classical liberals ground their understanding of human equality in natural-rights theory, whereas others reach similar conclusions about equality through consequentialist arguments, such as rule utilitarianism.
Mill's explicit account of practical rules is incompatible with rule utilitarianism but consistent with sophisticated act utilitarianism.
193) Therefore, act and rule utilitarianism are similar in that they focus on maximizing utility, but they differ because the former focuses solely on maximizing utility of each individual act while the latter is concerned with maximizing utility of repeatedly performed acts.
201) Whereas rule utilitarianism derives from a belief that a rule in question reflects an underlying utilitarian goal and that adherence to the rule will result in the realization of that goal, act utilitarianism derives from a belief that the utilitarian goal can only be realized through the measurement of the individual act directly against the goal sought to be realized.