Ruritania


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Ruritania

(ˌrʊərɪˈteɪnɪə; -njə)
n
1. (Placename) an imaginary kingdom of central Europe: setting of several novels by English novelist Anthony Hope (1863–1933), esp The Prisoner of Zenda (1894)
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) an imaginary kingdom of central Europe: setting of several novels by English novelist Anthony Hope (1863–1933), esp The Prisoner of Zenda (1894)
3. (Placename) any setting of adventure, romance, and intrigue
4. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) any setting of adventure, romance, and intrigue
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Ruritania - an imaginary kingdom in central Europe; often used as a scene for intrigue and romance
fictitious place, imaginary place, mythical place - a place that exists only in imagination; a place said to exist in fictional or religious writings
References in periodicals archive ?
9) An Acadian investor contracts with the government of Ruritania to operate a dolomite quarry for twenty years.
Popular comparisons to the 1959 movie The Mouse that Roared and to the Ruritania of Anthony Hope's novel The Prisoner of Zenda are easy but a tad cheap and more than a tad inaccurate.
While holidaying in Ruritania, Rudolf Rassendyll is called upon to impersonate its king - an act which places Rassendyll in mortal danger but is vital to the country's fate (1952)
You've had a good run, but it's time to replace Ruritania with a democratic republic.
Ruritania and Windpower sign a contract for the development of the offshore power plant.
Naci en la Republica Socialista de Ruritania, un pais que ya no existe, y mi primer recuerdo es el jardin cubierto de nieve de los multifamiliares donde mi madre y yo vivimos hospedados en el departamento de los Ziema, un matrimonio joven de profesores que no puede tener hijos.
THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL Friday, Sky Movies Premiere, 8pm PREMIERE Young bellhop Tony Revolori is tutored in the rules of refinement by concierge Ralph Fiennes (above), a fastidious bon vivant behind bars in Ruritania between the wars.
In the story Hope crafted, red hair is the characteristic feature of both the "English gentleman" Rudolf Rassendyll and his distant cousin Rudolf V, scion of the royal Elphberg family and titular king of Ruritania.
The discussion shall now return to the argument that characterization of proprietary restitutionary claims as property may be open to abuse: for example, could General Thahir's wife have transferred the money, which had long been deposited in Singapore, over to her Ruritanian account, having learned that the domestic law of Ruritania did not recognize the claimant's proprietary interest in the fund?
Because of that difference, the question of whether a sitting in Ruritania violates Ruritanian sovereignty is distinct from the question of whether the presence of the Australian Defence Force ('ADF') does so.
There are times, folks, when I think we live in Ruritania.