Russell's paradox

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Related to Russel's paradox: Russell's viper

Russell's paradox

n
(Logic) logic the paradox discovered by Bertrand Russell in the work of Gottlob Frege, that the class of all classes that are not members of themselves is a member of itself only if it is not, and is not only if it is. This undermines the notion of an all-inclusive universal class
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To further improve our understanding of cantor's diagonal argument and uncountable sets, the cantor's diagonal argument has been used to show that Russel's paradox of barber also produces an uncountable set.
In section IV, the author will show, by applying the cantor's diagonal argument, that Russel's paradox of barber produces and uncountable set.
Without disturbing the logics, Russel's paradox can be restated as: "Suppose that there are 5 people (Mustafa, Zain, Fahad, Ali, and Tahir) living in a village under a condition that one of them is always a barber.