Russian doll

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Russian doll

n
any of a set of hollow wooden figures, each of which splits in half to contain the next smallest figure, down to the smallest. Also called: matryoshka or matrioshka
Translations
matruşka
References in periodicals archive ?
In what Hollywood this week described as "absolutely the best" standard of baking the show has seen to date, the hopefuls step up to the showstopper challenge by presenting cakes that look like other things, including a champagne bucket, a sandwich, Russian dolls, a bowl of ramen soup and a mouthwatering stack of pancakes.
Babushka ITV, 5pm Imagine Deal or No Deal with Russian dolls instead of boxes and you'd have something along the lines of ITV's new quiz show.
Basically it's 10 huge Russian dolls, you choose a doll, and then you have to answer a true or false question.
Russian dolls, lots of luck and a PS44,000 jackpot they're the intriguing ingredients for Rylan Clark-Neal's new quiz.
They are mostly schemers, debauched or emotionally dead; as full of themselves as a set of Russian dolls, so not the best people to advise the three young leads.
A row of little girls, dressed as Russian dolls, walked up the runway holding Kindles with the alphabets of Valaya's show name glowing on the screens.
each nest of Russian dolls is carved from a single piece of lime wood, and the smallest can be the size of a grain of rice.
The Capitol's crowning piece is actually two domes, one nested under the other like Russian dolls, and separated by a web of cast iron braces hidden from view.
They have, however, already had their own Lifetime reality show, last year's Russian Dolls.
The moons form a series of neatly nested orbits, a bit like Russian dolls," said Mark Showalter of the SETI Institute in Mountain View, USA, leader of the scientific team that discovered the new moon.
Films discussed include Peter Weir's The Truman Show, the corpus of Michael Haneke, Mike Leigh's Naked, the Coen Broethers' The Man Who Wasn't There and No Country for Old Men, the Dardenne Brothers' Lorna's Silence, Sofia Coppola's Lost in Translation, Neil Jordan's The Crying Game, Ousmane Sembene's Moolaade, Cedric Klapisch's The Spanish Apartment and Russian Dolls, and Baz Luhrmann's William Shakespeare's Romeo + Juliet.

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