Rusticated


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rus·ti·cate

 (rŭs′tĭ-kāt′)
v. rus·ti·cat·ed, rus·ti·cat·ing, rus·ti·cates
v.intr.
To go to or live in the country.
v.tr.
1. To send to the country.
2. Chiefly British To suspend (a student) from a university.
3. To cut or shape (masonry blocks) with deep-set joints and a rough-hewn face.

[Latin rūsticārī, rūsticāt-, from rūsticus, rustic; see rustic.]

rus′ti·ca′tion n.
rus′ti·ca′tor n.
References in classic literature ?
He had purchased the post of lieutenant of dragoons, and afterwards came to be a captain; but having quarrelled with his colonel, was by his interest obliged to sell; from which time he had entirely rusticated himself, had betaken himself to studying the Scriptures, and was not a little suspected of an inclination to methodism.
James, then a hobbadehoy, was now become a young man, having had the benefits of a university education, and acquired the inestimable polish which is gained by living in a fast set at a small college, and contracting debts, and being rusticated, and being plucked.
You see he has just rusticated long enough to excite curiosity, and not long enough for men to have forgotten that deuced unpleasant--by-the-bye--you know the rights of the affair, of course?