Ruth Benedict


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Noun1.Ruth Benedict - United States anthropologist (1887-1948)
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THE CHRYSANTHEMUM AND THE SWORD (1946) | RUTH BENEDICT
In her classic 1934 work Patterns of Culture, Ruth Benedict discusses the role of custom and tradition in an individual's cultural experience and belief system.
Other musicians and scholars she discusses are Jacqueline du Pres, William James, Ruth Benedict, and Nadia Boulanger.
However, Gray's work, particularly with its focus on queer youth, is a welcome addition to this scholarship, and with good reason it was awarded the 2009 Ruth Benedict Prize by the American Anthropological Association for outstanding monograph.
including Ruth Benedict, Gregory Bateson, Clyde Kluckhohn and Margaret
Honor is the perpetual goal of Japanese, wrote American anthropologist Ruth Benedict in her acclaimed 1946 book, ''The Chrysanthemum and the Sword.
Her mud mask and sagging lotus position give her an aura of middle-aged-lady-adopting-primitive-ritual, which closely resembles that projected in Bornstein's rendering of the anthropologist Ruth Benedict in Study for 16mm Film (Ruth Benedict, Lover and Mentor of Margaret Mead), 2005, kneeling on the floor in full tribal costume.
The anthropologist Ruth Benedict summed up much of prayer when she said, "Religion is universally a technique for success.
He has already read The Chrysanthemum and the Sword written by the late Columbia University professor Ruth Benedict in 1946.
The editorial board over the years has included Hannah Arendt, Jacques Barzun, Saul Bellow, Ruth Benedict, Henry Steele Commager, Ralph Ellison, John Hope Franklin, John Kenneth Galbraith, Eugene Genovese, Lillian Hellman, Archibald MacLeish, Arthur Schlesinger, Jr.
Fredrickson devotes an interesting appendix to a brief discussion of modern writers on race, including Ruth Benedict and my old Columbia professor and dean, Jacques Barzun, whose early views on racism come off rather badly.
Intertwined Lives; Margaret Mead, Ruth Benedict, and Their Circle, Lois W.