S-wave

(redirected from S-waves)
Related to S-waves: P-waves

S-wave

(ĕs′wāv′)
n.
A seismic wave that travels relatively quickly through the earth, causing the rocks it passes through to change shape, and the particles of the rocks to vibrate at right angles to the direction of wave propagation. S-waves can travel through solids but not through liquids or gases. Also called shear wave.

[S(econdary) wave, since it is the second type of wave, after the faster P-waves, to be detected by a seismograph after a seismic event.]
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S-waves travelling through the Earth will bounce or reflect off material interfaces inside the Earth, arriving at different times depending on where they interact with these interfaces.
One type of S-wave reflects from Earth's surface halfway between an earthquake and a seismometer.
S-waves traveling through the Earth will bounce or reflect off material interfaces inside the Earth, arriving at different times depending on where they interact with these interfaces.
Then five minutes of S-waves and feeling sort of seasick," he added.
The S-waves are secondary and have a more up-and-down motion.
1961, S-waves and the structure of the upper mantle, Geophys.
Alfaro shows his results on the application of a heuristic method for estimation of velocity structure for S-waves and compares his findings with existing PS-logging data.
An alarm would sound with the first P-waves, a few crucial moments before ground-shaking S-waves arrive.
Therefore, we can represent the collision in terms of two s-waves, one p-wave, and two d-waves.
He explained how progress towards the critical point where a stressed rock mass fractures and causes an earthquake can be monitored by analysing seismic shear, or S-waves.
These waves arrive at seismic stations before secondary waves, or S-waves, which shake molecules from side to side.
In several regions, such as south of the Indonesian island of Java or in the Coral Sea northeast of Australia, P-wave and S-wave images show broad, plumelike features rising from the base of the mantle but extending only halfway to Earth's surface.