S-wave

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Related to S-waves: P-waves

S-wave

(ĕs′wāv′)
n.
A seismic wave that travels relatively quickly through the earth, causing the rocks it passes through to change shape, and the particles of the rocks to vibrate at right angles to the direction of wave propagation. S-waves can travel through solids but not through liquids or gases. Also called shear wave.

[S(econdary) wave, since it is the second type of wave, after the faster P-waves, to be detected by a seismograph after a seismic event.]
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This is crucial for earthquake warning system because P-waves travel faster but S-waves cause more damage.
The majority of recorded microseismic events in this dataset have very clear arrivals of the P- and S-waves, but due to the strong anisotropy of investigated geological interval, the S-wave arrivals are always splitted, which can be observed even for the perforation shots (Fig.
S-waves travelling through the Earth will bounce or reflect off material interfaces inside the Earth, arriving at different times depending on where they interact with these interfaces.
Engineers at Weir-Jones recognized that the destructive energy of an earthquake is related to large S-waves that are preceded by the smaller-amplitude P-waves arriving on site seconds earlier.
Then five minutes of S-waves and feeling sort of seasick," he added.
The theoretical arrival time of each reflected wave originating from P- and S-waves reflected from a virtual reflection point was calculated, and the calculated value of parameter [Z.
1961, S-waves and the structure of the upper mantle, Geophys.
Alfaro shows his results on the application of a heuristic method for estimation of velocity structure for S-waves and compares his findings with existing PS-logging data.
An alarm would sound with the first P-waves, a few crucial moments before ground-shaking S-waves arrive.
Therefore, we can represent the collision in terms of two s-waves, one p-wave, and two d-waves.
Sure, it rattled some nerves and jarred some windows in the populated counties (the S-waves were felt for hundreds of miles), but no more so than a sonic boom.
He explained how progress towards the critical point where a stressed rock mass fractures and causes an earthquake can be monitored by analysing seismic shear, or S-waves.