sat

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SAT

 (ĕs′ā-tē′)
A trademark for a set of standardized college entrance examinations.

sat

 (săt)
v.
Past tense and past participle of sit.

sat

(sæt)
vb
the past tense and past participle of sit

sat

(sʌt)
adj
1. very tired; exhausted
2. drunk
[Afrikaans]

SAT

abbreviation for
(Education) (in the US) Scholastic Aptitude Test

sat

(sæt)

v.
a pt. and pp. of sit.

SAT

Trademark. college admissions tests sponsored by the College Entrance Examination Board: the SAT I measures mathematical and verbal reasoning skills, and the SAT II measures knowledge in specific subject areas.

Sat.

1. Saturday.
2. Saturn.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sat - the seventh and last day of the weekSat - the seventh and last day of the week; observed as the Sabbath by Jews and some Christians
weekday - any day except Sunday (and sometimes except Saturday)
weekend - a time period usually extending from Friday night through Sunday; more loosely defined as any period of successive days including one and only one Sunday
Translations

Sat

abbr of SaturdaySa.

sit

(sit) present participle sitting: past tense, past participle sat (sӕt) verb
1. to (cause to) rest on the buttocks; to (cause to) be seated. He likes sitting on the floor; They sat me in the chair and started asking questions.
2. to lie or rest; to have a certain position. The parcel is sitting on the table.
3. (with on) to be an official member of (a board, committee etc). He sat on several committees.
4. (of birds) to perch. An owl was sitting in the tree by the window.
5. to undergo (an examination).
6. to take up a position, or act as a model, in order to have one's picture painted or one's photograph taken. She is sitting for a portrait/photograph.
7. (of a committee, parliament etc) to be in session. Parliament sits from now until Christmas.
ˈsitter noun
1. a person who poses for a portrait etc.
2. a baby-sitter.
ˈsitting noun
a period of continuous action, meeting etc. I read the whole book at one sitting; The committee were prepared for a lengthy sitting.
ˈsit-in noun
an occupation of a building etc by protesters. The students staged a sit-in.
ˈsitting-room noun
a room used mainly for sitting in.
sitting target, sitting duck
someone or something that is in an obvious position to be attacked. If they're reducing staff, he's a sitting target.
sit back
to rest and take no part in an activity. He just sat back and let it all happen.
sit down
to (cause to) take a seat, take a sitting position. Let's sit down over here; He sat the child down on the floor.
sit out
1. to remain seated during a dance. Let's sit (this one) out.
2. to remain inactive and wait until the end of. They'll try to sit out the crisis.
sit tight
to keep the same position or be unwilling to move or act. The best thing to do is to sit tight and see if things improve.
sit up
1. to rise to a sitting position. Can the patient sit up?
2. to remain awake, not going to bed. I sat up until 3 a.m. waiting for you!

sat

pret & pp de sit
References in periodicals archive ?
The weeks until SAT scores are released can be torturous, and anxieties run high once the dreaded day arrives.
With SAT scores, after a certain threshold like a high 700 in each section, it's all the same for the committees that screen applicants.
on those who report applying for a teaching job or teachers who begin classroom positions in the year immediately after receiving an undergraduate degree, we find that teacher applicants and new teachers in recent years have significantly higher SAT scores than their counterparts in the mid-1990s.
A study by Mattern and Patterson (2009) examined the relationship between SAT scores and retention to the second year.
Some also speculate that the longer SAT is a factor in declines in SAT scores (Arenson, 2006c).
A report from the Texas Education Agency on the state's 2012 SAT scores shows two things about Texas students over the past five years: More students are the taking the test, but they aren't performing as well.
Williams, Waldauer, and Duggal (1992) found that Math SAT scores were positively related and statistically significant to success in non-essay economics tests.
those with higher SAT scores and high school grade point average [HSGPA]) perform better in college across a variety of indicators: first-year grade point average (FYGPA; e.
The growing trend toward de-emphasizing SAT scores in college admissions may well be a good thing for otherwise talented and promising students who really do not perform at their best on standardized tests.
high-school students who need high SAT scores to gain admission to
In the Roufagalas study, SAT scores were useful for the non-honors-college population whereas HSGPA was the most important predictor of grades for honors students.
In addition, we used a second metric that predicted the percentage of students on Pell Grants based on SAT scores.