Sabellian


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Sa·bel·li·an

 (sə-bĕl′ē-ən)
n.
1. Christianity An adherent of Sabellianism.
2. See Sabellic.
3. A speaker of a Sabellic language.

Sa·bel′li·an adj.

Sabellian

(səˈbɛlɪən)
n
1. (Languages) an extinct language or group of languages of ancient Italy, surviving only in a few inscriptions belonging to the Osco-Umbrian group
2. (Historical Terms) an extinct language or group of languages of ancient Italy, surviving only in a few inscriptions belonging to the Osco-Umbrian group
3. (Peoples) a member of any of the ancient peoples speaking this language, including the Sabines
4. (Historical Terms) a member of any of the ancient peoples speaking this language, including the Sabines
adj
5. (Peoples) of or relating to this language or its speakers
6. (Languages) of or relating to this language or its speakers
[C17: from Latin Sabellī group of Italian tribes]

Sa•bel•li•an

(səˈbɛl i ən)

n.
a member of any of a number of Oscan-speaking peoples of ancient Italy, including the Sabines and Samnites.
[1595–1605; < Latin Sabell(us) a Sabellian + -ian]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Sabellian - an extinct Osco-Umbrian language of ancient Italy that survives only in a few inscriptions
Osco-Umbrian - a group of dead languages of ancient Italy; they were displace by Latin
Translations
sabellique
References in periodicals archive ?
Dollinger's historical work directly challenged and undermined this claim by pointing out Sabellian theological errors of Pope Callistus I (217-222).
His 'liberty' from tradition, reading the Bible in his own way, led him to be a Socinian a non-Trinitarian, a modalist, a Sabellian --as the authors relate.
They give only some traces of a present in Sabellian and Welsh and some nominal forms in Latin and Old High German, and refer to Turner 1966: 4561, 4775 for an Indo-Aryan root *cagh 'to strive after'; however they make no mention of the Avestan forms.
The second etymological possibility is to derive -ne from one of the Sabellian languages, which covered the southern regions of ancient Italy and the central regions not covered by Etruscan.
The other three are in the Common Sabellian subgroup: Oscan, Umbrian, and South Picene.
In the context of the Sabellian accusations, Bushnell would begin to use the term instrumentalism to describe his position regarding God's expression to humans.
In part 3, she discusses how Leibniz learned from correspondents about the antitrinitarians in England and vigorously rejected their modalism of the Sabellian type.
He maintained that tritheism is deeply embedded in the Christian imagination and "is a much greater danger than a Sabellian modalism.
10) But while he considered Sabellian ideas--the idea that it was impossible to separate the persons of God--and tritheistic views, which suggested that the persons of the Trinity were separate and distinct, eventually he admitted "I had lost the Trinity.
Though he seems not to realize it, Shawcross makes Milton almost a Sabellian who sees aspects and functions rather than persons in the Godhead.
Often the martyr was regarded as an apostate by his brethren, and the Carpocratian Christian expired beneath the sword of the Roman executioner, excommunicated by the Ebionite Christian, that which Ebionite was anathema to the Sabellian.
My conjecture would therefore be that the crime ascribed to Origen, that of calling the Son innatus, was not the Sabellian error (b),(31) but either (a) or (c) or a combination.