Sadduceeism


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Sad·du·cee

 (săj′ə-sē′, săd′yə-)
n.
A member of a priestly, aristocratic Jewish sect founded in the second century bc that accepted only the written Mosaic law and that ceased to exist after the destruction of the Temple in ad 70.

[Middle English Saducee, from Old English Sadducēas, Sadducees, from Late Latin Sadducaeī, from Greek Saddoukaioi, from Mishnaic Hebrew ṣədûqî, after ṣādôq, Zadok, high priest in the time of David and Solomon, from ṣādôq, just, righteous, from ṣādaq, to be just; see ṣdq in Semitic roots.]

Sad′du·ce′an (-sē′ən) adj.
Sad′du·cee′ism n.

Sadduceeism, Sadducism

the beliefs and practices of an ancient Jewish sect made up largely of the priestly aristocracy and opposing the Pharisees in both political and doctrinal matters, especially literal and less legalistic interpretation of the Jewish law, rejection of the rabbinical and prophetic traditions, and denying immortality, retribution in a future life, and the existence of angels. Cf. Phariseeism. — Sadducee, n. — Sadducean, adj.
See also: Judaism