Salvadoran

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Sal·va·do·ran

 (săl′və-dôr′ən) or Sal·va·do·ri·an (-dôr′ē-ən)
adj.
Of or relating to El Salvador or its people or culture.
n.
A native or inhabitant of El Salvador.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Salvadoran - a native or inhabitant of El SalvadorSalvadoran - a native or inhabitant of El Salvador
El Salvador, Republic of El Salvador, Salvador - a republic on the Pacific coast of Central America
South American - a native or inhabitant of South America
Adj.1.Salvadoran - of or relating to or characteristic of El Salvador or its people; "Salvadoran coffee"; "Salvadoran guerillas"
Translations

Salvadoran

[ˌsælvəˈdɔːrən] Salvadorean, Salvadorian [ˌsælvəˈdɔːrɪən]
A. ADJsalvadoreño
B. Nsalvadoreño/a m/f
References in periodicals archive ?
The festive atmosphere, outpouring of praise, huge turnout (nearly 300,000 people showed up for the event), and cross-party participation seemed to bear that assessment out, suggesting that Salvadorans may finally have reached something of a consensus on Romero.
In 1989, the Bush administration arranged Vides Casanova's entry into the United States, which had deported hundreds of poor Salvadorans to an unknown fate during the war.
Aware of the concerns of Salvadorans regarding the business climate, Hondurans are working on attracting those companies.
Police helped the Salvadorans leave the village after angry residents surrounded the police station.
That allowed innumerable Salvadorans to reduce their home payments by a factor of four and to purchase cars and homes.
The war led some citizens to flee to Los Angeles, where El Salvadorans started MS-13, also known as Mara Salvatrucha or La Mara.
immigration policy and its relevance to Salvadorans abroad.
Drug use among Salvadorans was a growing concern, particularly among youth, although reliable statistics for illegal consumption were not kept by the government.
WASHINGTON, March 23 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The Center for Democracy in the Americas (CDA) joins Salvadorans and others around the world in commemorating the 30th anniversary of the murder of Archbishop Oscar Arnulfo Romero.
When Salvadorans elected Mauricio Funes of the Farabundo Marti National Liberation Front (FMLN) as president on March 15, they sided with a different political party than the one that has been in power for the past 20 years.
First, we describe the origins of the sanctuary movement in the United States and provide background information on the causes of political upheaval and migration by Salvadorans to the United States.
The additional time affects about 230,000 Salvadorans, 7,800 Hondurans and 4,000 Nicaraguans, the agency said.