Salvationist

(redirected from Salvationists)

Sal·va·tion·ist

 (săl-vā′shə-nĭst)
n.
1. A member of the Salvation Army.
2. salvationist One who preaches salvation; an evangelist.

salvationist

(sælˈveɪʃənɪst)
n
1. (Protestantism) a member of an evangelical sect emphasizing the doctrine of salvation
2. (Protestantism) (often capital) a member of the Salvation Army
adj
3. (Protestantism) stressing the doctrine of salvation
4. (Protestantism) (often capital) of or relating to the Salvation Army
salˈvationism n

Sal•va•tion•ist

(sælˈveɪ ʃə nɪst)

n.
1. a member of the Salvation Army.
2. (l.c.) a person who preaches salvation.
Translations

salvationist

[sælˈveɪʃnɪst] Nmiembro mf del Ejército de Salvación

salvationist

nHeilsprediger(in) m(f); (also Salvationist: = of Salvation Army) → Angehörige(r) mfder Heilsarmee

salvationist

Salvationist [sælˈveɪʃnɪst] nsalutista m/f
References in periodicals archive ?
In Great Britain that 'vast network' could offer emigration advice in most small towns, but were aided in making the benefits of Canada known by a large number of Canadian Salvationists sent over to publicize the service, some of whom, like the well-known Brandon Mayor and provincial politician, George Dinsdale, had once been emigrants themselves.
It was a sort of super-car, still in the service, to which Salvationists still refer with an affectionate amazement when they consider its terrific accomplishments.
ply nspired into y nes, Crippling poverty and strife in the Cornish copper mines, bravery and loss in war, and stoic Salvationists all came when he began delving the past.
ply nspired into y Crippling poverty and strife in the Cornish copper mines, bravery and loss in war, and stoic nes, me to light ving into Salvationists all came when he began delving the past.
and cyber power evolves, the Salvationists and alarmists are falling
CRIPPLING poverty and strife in the Cornish copper mines, bravery and loss in war, and stoic Salvationists all came to light when Shakin' Stevens began delving into his family history.
With James Kelly, a soldier of the Edmonton corps, as their driver, and with three other Salvationists (Frank Keil, James Norn, and Willie Groat) as freighters, they spent the following morning preparing their outfit--tents, food for a two weeks' trip, horses, wagons, and such.
The dwindling use of films by the Army from 1908, suggests the possibility that the Salvationists were caught up in and persuaded by the outcry against the cinema in the wider culture.
There was also a gathering of Salvationists from the North at Middlesbrough Town hall in 1980, where they were greeting the new head of the Salvation Army, Commissioner John D Needham.
Despite the economic significance of their work, most Salvationists imagined such girls as sex workers.
Taking women from what she calls the 'backdrop' of the literature on colonial governance, she convincingly demonstrates that elite Lagos women did not consider themselves inferior to European Salvationists.
Increasingly African Salvationists were recruited to pastor African corps and teach in the schools, but Western officers (clergy) maintained administrative control at territorial (Rhodesian) headquarters.