saprotroph

(redirected from Saprobes)

saprotroph

(ˈsæprəʊˌtrəʊf)
n
(Microbiology) any organism, esp a fungus or bacterium, that lives and feeds on dead organic matter. Also called: saprobe or saprobiont
saprotrophic adj
ˌsaproˈtrophically adv
References in periodicals archive ?
2007) suggested that under certain conditions, some ECM fungal symbionts behave as saprobes, using litter and soil organic matter as substrates and providing the host trees with carbon at time when demand is high and photoassimilates are not yet available.
Weeds, weed residues, cover crops and green manures increase the organic residue in the soil, and pathogens such as Fusarium and Pythium species can survive in soil as facultative saprobes on these simple organic substrates when plant hosts are absent.
This was attributed to the sawdust's slow decomposition possibly favoring the growth of competitive soil saprobes to the detriment of soil pathogens that use simple organic substrates.
Fungi in the phylum Chytridiomycota have a nearly global distribution and occupy roles as heterotrophs and saprobes in water and soil (32).
Otomycosis is sporadic and caused by a wide variety of fungi, most of which are saprobes occurring in diverse types of environmental material.
Normally, the fugal strains that produce AF reside in soil as saprobes, but can be transmitted to plant tissues when conditions are favorable (Gourama and Bullerman, 1995).
Fungi play several different roles in plant biology, acting as plant pathogens, saprobes (decomposers of dead plant material), or plant symbionts, with neutral, beneficial, or negative impacts on living plant hosts.
Many species occur as saprobes, some live endophytically, whereas others are root pathogens.
are common soil saprobes, occasionally isolated from human skin.