saprotroph

(redirected from Saprotrophic)

saprotroph

(ˈsæprəʊˌtrəʊf)
n
(Microbiology) any organism, esp a fungus or bacterium, that lives and feeds on dead organic matter. Also called: saprobe or saprobiont
saprotrophic adj
ˌsaproˈtrophically adv
References in periodicals archive ?
Here, we use signature PLFAs to investigate the overall saprotrophic microbial community in the soils and its relationships to salinity as well as other physical and chemical soil properties.
The PLFA 18:2[omega]6,9 was used as an indicator of the biomass of saprotrophic fungi (Olsson et al.
This is not surprising because ECM fungi have evolved from saprotrophic ancestors on several independent occasions (Hibbett et al.
2007) studied spatial separation of litter decomposition and mycorrhizal nitrogen uptake in a boreal forest and reported that saprotrophic fungi were primarily confined to relatively recently (< 4 yr) shed litter components on the surface of the forest floor, where organic carbon was mineralized while nitrogen was retained a Mycorrhizal fungi dominated in the underlying, more decomposed litter and humus, where they apparently mobilized N and made it available to their host plants.
Production of extracellular enzymes and degradation of biopolymers by saprotrophic microfungi from the upper layers of forest soil.
Clonal and seasonal shifts in communities of saprotrophic microfungi and soil enzyme activities in the mycorrhizosphere of Salix spp.
Saprotrophic and mycorrhizal fungi have higher 813C values than their substrates and/or plants in several woodland ecosystems (Mcilwee & Johnson 1998; Hobbie et al.
13]C-enriched sporocarps of ectomycorrhizal and saprotrophic fungi?
A comparison of mycorrhyzal and saprotrophic fungus tolerance to creosote in vitro.
It was found that the aspirin solutions supported photosynthetic growth; however, the ibuprofen solutions caused the euglena to become saprotrophic and die.
Keywords: Fungi; fungal taxonomy; saprotrophic fungi; mycorrhizal fungi; Fungimap.
The genus Lagenidium, introduced by Schenk in 1857 (S), comprises numerous saprotrophic species (9), as well as several members that are pathogenic to algae, phytoplankton, pollen, barnacles, blue crabs, mosquito larvae, shrimp, and mammals (3-5).