satire

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Related to Satirists: satire

sat·ire

 (săt′īr′)
n.
1.
a. A literary work in which human foolishness or vice is attacked through irony, derision, or wit.
b. The branch of literature constituting such works.
2. Irony, sarcasm, or caustic wit used to attack or expose human foolishness or vice.

[Latin satira, probably alteration (influenced by Greek satur, satyr, and saturos, burlesque of a mythical episode) of (lanx) satura, fruit (plate) mixture, from feminine of satur, sated, well-fitted; see sā- in Indo-European roots.]

satire

(ˈsætaɪə)
n
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a novel, play, entertainment, etc, in which topical issues, folly, or evil are held up to scorn by means of ridicule and irony
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the genre constituted by such works
3. the use of ridicule, irony, etc, to create such an effect
[C16: from Latin satira a mixture, from satur sated, from satis enough]

sat•ire

(ˈsæt aɪər)

n.
1. the use of irony, sarcasm, or ridicule in exposing, denouncing, or deriding vice, folly, etc.
2. a literary composition or genre in which human folly and vice are held up to scorn, derision, or ridicule.
[1500–10; < Latin satira, variant of satura medley, perhaps feminine derivative of satur sated (see saturate)]
syn: See irony1.

satire

A genre using irony or ridicule to hold contentious issues, folly, or evil in scorn.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.satire - witty language used to convey insults or scornsatire - witty language used to convey insults or scorn; "he used sarcasm to upset his opponent"; "irony is wasted on the stupid"; "Satire is a sort of glass, wherein beholders do generally discover everybody's face but their own"--Jonathan Swift
humor, wit, witticism, wittiness, humour - a message whose ingenuity or verbal skill or incongruity has the power to evoke laughter

satire

noun
1. mockery, wit, irony, ridicule, sarcasm, raillery, pasquinade It's an easy target for satire.
2. parody, mockery, caricature, send-up (Brit. informal), spoof (informal), travesty, takeoff (informal), lampoon, skit, burlesque A sharp satire on the American political process.
Quotations
"It's hard not to write satire" [Juvenal Satires]
"Satire is a sort of glass, wherein beholders do generally discover everybody's face but their own" [Jonathan Swift The Battle of the Books]

satire

noun
A work, as a novel or play, that exposes folly by the use of humor or irony:
Translations
نَقْد ساخِر، كِتابة ساخِرَه
satira
satire
szatíra
háîsádeila, satíra
satyrasatyrikassatyrinissatyriškai parodyti
satīra
satiră
satira
satir
сатира

satire

[ˈsætaɪəʳ] Nsátira f (on contra)

satire

[ˈsætaɪər] nsatire f
a satire on sth → une satire sur qch

satire

nSatire f (→ on auf +acc); the satire in his voicedie Ironie in seiner Stimme

satire

[ˈsætaɪəʳ] n satire (on)satira (di, su)

satire

(ˈsӕtaiə) noun
(a piece of) writing etc that makes someone look foolish. a satire on university life.
saˈtirical (-ˈti-) adjective
1. of satire. satirical writing.
2. mocking. in a satirical mood.
ˈsatirist (-ˈti-) noun
a person who writes or performs satire(s).
ˈsatirize, ˈsatirise (-ti-) verb
to make look foolish by using satire.
References in classic literature ?
Swift, then, is the greatest of English satirists and the only one who as a satirist claims large attention in a brief general survey of English literature.
In an old book I find columns of notes about works projected at this time, nearly all to consist of essays on deeply uninteresting subjects; the lightest was to be a volume on the older satirists, beginning with Skelton and Tom Nash - the half of that manuscript still lies in a dusty chest - the only story was about Mary Queen of Scots, who was also the subject of many unwritten papers.
My brother was to be his representative and successor; he must go to Eton and Oxford, for the sake of making connexions, of course: my father was not a man to underrate the bearing of Latin satirists or Greek dramatists on the attainment of an aristocratic position.
How sad that so justly famous a satirist should mar his work by ridicule of people with long noses - who are the salt of the earth
Now he would take up the position of a practical man and condemn dreamers; now that of a satirist, and laugh ironically at his opponents; now grow severely logical, or suddenly rise to the realm of metaphysics.
If his whole life, for instance, should have been one continued subject of satire, he may well tremble when an incensed satirist takes him in hand.
He was a sharp satirist, but with more railing and scoffery than became a poet-laureate,"* said one.
Paul; and anon, complete his own portrait with one of those touches of pitiless realism which the satirist so often seeks in vain.
To have painted the sordid facts of their lives, and they throughout invoking the death's head apparition of the family gentility to come and scare their benefactors, would have made Young John a satirist of the first water.
satirist is popularly regarded as a soul-spirited knave, and his ever
But in that bitter tirade upon Chantilly, which appeared in yesterday's'Musée,' the satirist, making some disgraceful allusions to the cobbler s change of name upon assuming the buskin, quoted a Latin line about which we have often conversed.
RECENTLY, Jon Stewart, host of The Daily Show and one of the world's most influential political satirists, resigned from the position he had held for 16 years.