satire

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sat·ire

 (săt′īr′)
n.
1.
a. A literary work in which human foolishness or vice is attacked through irony, derision, or wit.
b. The branch of literature constituting such works.
2. Irony, sarcasm, or caustic wit used to attack or expose human foolishness or vice.

[Latin satira, probably alteration (influenced by Greek satur, satyr, and saturos, burlesque of a mythical episode) of (lanx) satura, fruit (plate) mixture, from feminine of satur, sated, well-fitted; see sā- in Indo-European roots.]

satire

(ˈsætaɪə)
n
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a novel, play, entertainment, etc, in which topical issues, folly, or evil are held up to scorn by means of ridicule and irony
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the genre constituted by such works
3. the use of ridicule, irony, etc, to create such an effect
[C16: from Latin satira a mixture, from satur sated, from satis enough]

sat•ire

(ˈsæt aɪər)

n.
1. the use of irony, sarcasm, or ridicule in exposing, denouncing, or deriding vice, folly, etc.
2. a literary composition or genre in which human folly and vice are held up to scorn, derision, or ridicule.
[1500–10; < Latin satira, variant of satura medley, perhaps feminine derivative of satur sated (see saturate)]
syn: See irony1.

satire

A genre using irony or ridicule to hold contentious issues, folly, or evil in scorn.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.satire - witty language used to convey insults or scornsatire - witty language used to convey insults or scorn; "he used sarcasm to upset his opponent"; "irony is wasted on the stupid"; "Satire is a sort of glass, wherein beholders do generally discover everybody's face but their own"--Jonathan Swift
humor, wit, witticism, wittiness, humour - a message whose ingenuity or verbal skill or incongruity has the power to evoke laughter

satire

noun
1. mockery, wit, irony, ridicule, sarcasm, raillery, pasquinade It's an easy target for satire.
2. parody, mockery, caricature, send-up (Brit. informal), spoof (informal), travesty, takeoff (informal), lampoon, skit, burlesque A sharp satire on the American political process.
Quotations
"It's hard not to write satire" [Juvenal Satires]
"Satire is a sort of glass, wherein beholders do generally discover everybody's face but their own" [Jonathan Swift The Battle of the Books]

satire

noun
A work, as a novel or play, that exposes folly by the use of humor or irony:
Translations
نَقْد ساخِر، كِتابة ساخِرَه
satira
satire
szatíra
háîsádeila, satíra
satyrasatyrikassatyrinissatyriškai parodyti
satīra
satiră
satira
satir
сатира

satire

[ˈsætaɪəʳ] Nsátira f (on contra)

satire

[ˈsætaɪər] nsatire f
a satire on sth → une satire sur qch

satire

nSatire f (→ on auf +acc); the satire in his voicedie Ironie in seiner Stimme

satire

[ˈsætaɪəʳ] n satire (on)satira (di, su)

satire

(ˈsӕtaiə) noun
(a piece of) writing etc that makes someone look foolish. a satire on university life.
saˈtirical (-ˈti-) adjective
1. of satire. satirical writing.
2. mocking. in a satirical mood.
ˈsatirist (-ˈti-) noun
a person who writes or performs satire(s).
ˈsatirize, ˈsatirise (-ti-) verb
to make look foolish by using satire.
References in periodicals archive ?
He makes his own short satrical films with his brother, reads 'Mad Magazine' and cheers on Manchester United each week.
DISGUSTED Martin Wanless aired his views over a piece in the weekly satrical look at the world of football, Oi Ref.
Bob Harrod's new pantomime will be titled Snow Person & The Seven Completely Ordinary People and is a satrical side-swipe at those who banned his previous production.