savagism

savagism

(ˈsævɪˌdʒɪzəm)
n
another name for savagery1, savagery2

savagism

the condition of having uncivilized or primitive qualities. — savagedom, n.
See also: Behavior
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References in periodicals archive ?
It is the religion which resulted from the sustaining faith held by the forebears of the present Africans" Over the years, some foreign scholars, investigators, missionaries and media outlets have been belittling the African traditional religion by describing it with some racially motivated terminologies such as savagism, juju, fetishism, animism, magic, paganism, heathenism and ancestral worship.
Roy Harvey Pearce maintains that in Cooper's tales "the idea of savagism is realized in the image of an Indian, in his gifts at once ignoble, an Indian whose fate was to be a means of understanding a civilization in which he, by civilized definition, could not participate" (Pearce 210).
He suggested that federal government should approach aggrieved families that suffered due to savagism of Taliban whether peace talks with Taliban should be carried or not.
Daniel Morley Johnson, "From Tomahawk Chop to Road Block: Discourses of Savagism in Whitestream Media" American Indian Quarterly 35, no.
One has only to see the work of an artist like Georgia O'Keefe to witness the savagism and philosophical complexity of female flower-paintings.
Both the savagism of war and the humanizing effects or properties of music have worked like tonics to produce the metamorphosis, what Stobrod calls the "revision in him" that "had come unexpected" (292), having been prompted by a dying girl's request to "play me something" and to "make me up a tune" (293, 294).
4) Rationalizing their misbegotten notions of superiority over the indigenous peoples of the Americas, the British, among other imperial Europeans devised the fiction of savagery--that is the Savagism Dogma.
It is interesting to see how Irving presents them in static terms: they pose, rather than act; they are quite literally reified into images of savagism on the point of extinction.
4) Roy Harvey Pearce, Savagism and Civilization: A Study of the Indian and the American Mind (Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1953).
15) Although fewer whites were attracted to the violence of the exotic Indian, nevertheless, some, such as Herman Lehmann, an Apache captive taken in 1870 at the age of eleven, and George Collett, a Shawnee renegade of the eighteenth century, relished and enacted the bloody savagism that closely attended the Otherness myth.
With it we kill our beeves and our hogs, and cut off our fowls' heads: do all things in fact, of the sort with it, where others use an axe, or a knife, or that far east savagism, the thumb and finger.