savagism

savagism

(ˈsævɪˌdʒɪzəm)
n
another name for savagery1, savagery2

savagism

the condition of having uncivilized or primitive qualities. — savagedom, n.
See also: Behavior
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References in periodicals archive ?
He suggested that federal government should approach aggrieved families that suffered due to savagism of Taliban whether peace talks with Taliban should be carried or not.
Both the savagism of war and the humanizing effects or properties of music have worked like tonics to produce the metamorphosis, what Stobrod calls the "revision in him" that "had come unexpected" (292), having been prompted by a dying girl's request to "play me something" and to "make me up a tune" (293, 294).
4) Rationalizing their misbegotten notions of superiority over the indigenous peoples of the Americas, the British, among other imperial Europeans devised the fiction of savagery--that is the Savagism Dogma.
It is interesting to see how Irving presents them in static terms: they pose, rather than act; they are quite literally reified into images of savagism on the point of extinction.
With it we kill our beeves and our hogs, and cut off our fowls' heads: do all things in fact, of the sort with it, where others use an axe, or a knife, or that far east savagism, the thumb and finger.
2001 Savagism and civilization: The Iranun, globalization and the literature of Joseph Conrad.
From the early nineteenth century on, as Roy Harvey Pearce notes in Savagism and Civilization, such torture had been the Indian's stock-in-trade in American popular fiction such as R.
After working up the results from consanguinity, I was compelled to change them, and to adopt the conclusion that "man commenced at the bottom of the scale" from which he worked himself up to his present status, that the record of this progress is still preserved to a remarkable extent in his inventions and discoveries which stand to each other in the ages of savagism, or barbarism and of civilization in a progressive series; and in his domestic and civil institutions which have been developed through the same periods.
In Savagism and Civilization: A Study of the Indian and the American Mind, Roy Harvey Pearce traces traditional American ideas about the Indian (essentially the tenets of progressive evolutionism, which at its most extreme became Social Darwinism) to a group of 18th century Scottish philosophers and historians who equated social, technical, and moral progress.
Most notably in relation to Meek, even the magisterial Henry Rowe Schoolcraft, author of the multi-volume Historical and Statistical Information Respecting the History, Condition, and Prospects of the Indian Tribes of the United States (1851-1857), had earlier weighed in with A/ha/ga (1843), a poetic romance of the Creek War (Pearce, Savagism and Civilization [Berkeley: University of California Press, 1988], p.
1996); and Roy Harvey Pearce, Savagism and Civilization: A Study of the Indian and the American Mind (1988).