Savannah

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Sa·van·nah

 (sə-văn′ə)
A city of southeast Georgia near the mouth of the Savannah River. Founded by James Oglethorpe in 1733, it is the oldest city in Georgia and has been a major port since the early 1800s.

Savannah

(səˈvænə)
n
1. (Placename) a port in the US, in E Georgia, near the mouth of the Savannah River: port of departure of the Savannah for Liverpool (1819), the first steamship to cross the Atlantic. Pop: 127 573 (2003 est)
2. (Placename) a river in the southeastern US, formed by the confluence of the Tugaloo and Seneca Rivers in NW South Carolina: flows southeast to the Atlantic. Length: 505 km (314 miles)

Sa•van•nah

(səˈvæn ə)

n.
1. a seaport in E Georgia, near the mouth of the Savannah River. 136,262.
2. a river flowing SE from E Georgia along most of the boundary between Georgia and South Carolina and into the Atlantic. 314 mi. (505 km) long.

savannah

An area of flat grassland in a tropical or subtropical region.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.savannah - a port in eastern Georgia near the mouth of the Savannah riverSavannah - a port in eastern Georgia near the mouth of the Savannah river
Empire State of the South, Georgia, Peach State, GA - a state in southeastern United States; one of the Confederate states during the American Civil War
2.savannah - a river in South Carolina that flows southeast to the AtlanticSavannah - a river in South Carolina that flows southeast to the Atlantic
Palmetto State, SC, South Carolina - a state in the Deep South; one of the original 13 colonies
3.savannah - a flat grassland in tropical or subtropical regionssavannah - a flat grassland in tropical or subtropical regions
grassland - land where grass or grasslike vegetation grows and is the dominant form of plant life
Translations

savannah

[səˈvænə] Nsabana f, pampa f (S. Cone), llanos mpl (Ven)

savannah

savanna [səˈvænə] nsavane f

savannah

savanna [səˈvænə] nsavana
References in classic literature ?
On the banks of this brook I found many pleasant savannahs or meadows, plain, smooth, and covered with grass; and on the rising parts of them, next to the higher grounds, where the water, as might be supposed, never overflowed, I found a great deal of tobacco, green, and growing to a great and very strong stalk.
The next day, the sixteenth, I went up the same way again; and after going something further than I had gone the day before, I found the brook and the savannahs cease, and the country become more woody than before.
To begin with the Polyborus Brasiliensis: this is a common bird, and has a wide geographical range; it is most numerous on the grassy savannahs of La Plata (where it goes by the name of Carrancha), and is far from unfrequent throughout the sterile plains of Patagonia.
Then he sealed it and addressed it to "Captain James Calhoun, Barque 'Lone Star,' Savannah, Georgia.
I went down to the Albert Dock and found that she had been taken down the river by the early tide this morning, homeward bound to Savannah.
By the time that their sailing-ship reaches Savannah the mail-boat will have carried this letter, and the cable will have informed the police of Savannah that these three gentlemen are badly wanted here upon a charge of murder.
And yet it called to him across that leagues-wide savannah, and was like a benediction to his long-suffering, pain racked spirit.
In the first shade, where the savannah yielded to the dense mountain jungle, he had collapsed to die.
He gave it me at Savannah, when he lay a-dying, like as if I was to now, you see.
So he stood waist-deep in the grass and looked regretfully across the rolling savannah and the soft-swelling foothills to the Lion's Head, a massive peak of rock that upreared into the azure from the midmost centre of Guadalcanar, a landmark used for bearings by every coasting mariner, a mountain as yet untrod by the foot of a white man.
His grand-uncle Stephen had built the engines for the Savannah, the first American steamship to cross the Atlantic Ocean; and his cousin Alfred was the friend and co-worker of Morse, the inventor of the telegraph.
She had written verses which were admired in the South, wore a full-length portrait of the commodore on her bosom and spoke with the accent of Savannah.