Saxonism

Sax·on·ism

 (săk′sə-nĭz′əm)
n.
An English word, phrase, or idiom of Anglo-Saxon origin.

Saxonism

a word, idiom, phrase, etc., of Anglo-Saxon or supposed Anglo-Saxon origin.
See also: Language
References in periodicals archive ?
Unfortunately for posterity he too enthusiastically described the changes then occurring in Germany, defending them as expressions of an essential Saxonism also seen in the Reformation.
The mainstream English periodicals, such as The Times, Punch, among others, helped circulate the dominant ideology of Saxonism and perpetuate the racial stereotypes against the Irish Celts.
Even so, Anglo Saxonism still welcomed the immigrant because it was believed that Americans had the remarkable ability to assimilate peoples from a wide range of racial origins.
For Leerssen, Arnold's Celtic lectures are not only a "counterblast" against the Saxonism of Charles Kingsley and Thomas Carlyle but also "one of the very first instances of the gradual dissociation between Britain and Germany, which was to accelerate from the 1870s onward.
For a discussion of the academic politics of Normanism and Saxonism, see CANTOR, supra note 3, at 268-86.
Stanley, on usages of the term `the dark ages'; Florence Bourgne, on post-medieval vanitas paintings; Renate Haas, on Dryden and old wives' tales (including the Wife of Bath's); Derek Brewer, on eighteenth-century translations of Chaucer; Laura Kendrick, on political Saxonism in eighteenth-century America; Rene Gallet, on Coleridge and Scholasticism; James Noble, on Marion Zimmer Bradley's Mists of Avalon; and Sandra Gorgievski, on Arthurian films.
Re-visioning history, the novels re-plot the lineage of the Tory party, locating its origins in the mythicized and renovated Saxonism of Victorian medieval historiography.