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school 1

1. An institution for the instruction of children or people under college age.
2. An institution for instruction in a skill or business: a secretarial school; a karate school.
a. A college or university.
b. An institution within or associated with a college or university that gives instruction in a specialized field and recommends candidates for degrees.
c. A division of an educational institution constituting several grades or classes: advanced to the upper school.
d. The student body of an educational institution.
e. The building or group of buildings housing an educational institution.
4. The process of being educated formally, especially education constituting a planned series of courses over a number of years: The children were put to school at home. What do you plan to do when you finish school?
5. A session of instruction: School will start in three weeks. He had to stay after school today.
a. A group of people, especially philosophers, artists, or writers, whose thought, work, or style demonstrates a common origin or influence or unifying belief: the school of Aristotle; the Venetian school of painters.
b. A group of people distinguished by similar manners, customs, or opinions: aristocrats of the old school.
7. Close-order drill instructions or exercises for military units or personnel.
8. Australian A group of people gathered together for gambling.
tr.v. schooled, school·ing, schools
1. To educate in or as if in a school.
2. To train or discipline: She is well schooled in literature. See Synonyms at teach.
3. Slang To defeat or put down decisively, especially in a humiliating manner: Our team got schooled by the worst team in the division.
Of or relating to school or education in schools: school supplies; a school dictionary.

[Middle English scole, from Old English scōl, from Latin schola, scola, from Greek skholē; see segh- in Indo-European roots.]

school 2

A large group of aquatic animals, especially fish, swimming together; a shoal.
intr.v. schooled, school·ing, schools
To swim in or form into a school.

[Middle English scole, from Middle Dutch; see skel- in Indo-European roots.]


pl n
1. (Historical Terms) the Schools the medieval Schoolmen collectively
2. (Education) (at Oxford University)
a. the Examination Schools, the University building in which examinations are held
b. informal the Second Public Examination for the degree of Bachelor of Arts; finals
References in classic literature ?
Our instructors were oddly assorted; wandering pioneer school-teachers, stranded ministers of the Gospel, a few enthusiastic young men just out of graduate schools.
The children have come from their schools, and the grown people from their workshops and their fields, on purpose to be happy, for, to-day, a new man is beginning to rule over them; and so -- as has been the custom of mankind ever since a nation was first gathered -- they make merry and rejoice: as if a good and golden year were at length to pass over the poor old world
The schools composing none but young and vigorous males, previously mentioned, offer a strong contrast to the harem schools.
He would not even hear of letting the children go to work--there were schools here in America for children, Jurgis had heard, to which they could go for nothing.
I have never declined paying the highway tax, because I am as desirous of being a good neighbor as I am of being a bad subject; and as for supporting schools, I am doing my part to educate my fellow countrymen now.
It is the uncivilized free and wild thinking in Hamlet and the Iliad, in all the scriptures and mythologies, not learned in the schools, that delights us.
I had started a teacher-factory and a lot of Sunday- schools the first thing; as a result, I now had an ad- mirable system of graded schools in full blast in those places, and also a complete variety of Protestant con- gregations all in a prosperous and growing condition.
Rebecca, I am afraid I punished you more than I meant," said Miss Dearborn, who was only eighteen herself, and in her year of teaching country schools had never encountered a child like Rebecca.
Pip," pursued Biddy, with a smile, as she raised her eyes to my face, "the new schools are not like the old, but I learnt a good deal from you after that time, and have had time since then to improve.
We give the fact as it occurs in Bannatyne's Journal, only premising that the Journalist held his master's opinions, both with respect to the Earl of Cassilis as an opposer of the king's party, and as being a detester of the practice of granting church revenues to titulars, instead of their being devoted to pious uses, such as the support of the clergy, expense of schools, and the relief of the national poor.
In most schools children are perfectly at liberty to learn their lessons or not, just as they please; but the principal reserves an equal liberty to whip them if they cannot repeat their tasks.
These schools are of several kinds, suited to different qualities, and both sexes.

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