scorched earth policy


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scorched earth policy

n
1. (Military) the policy in warfare of removing or destroying everything that might be useful to an invading enemy, esp by fire
2. (Economics) commerce a manoeuvre by a company expecting an unwelcome takeover bid in which apparent profitability is greatly reduced by a reversible operation, such as borrowing at an exorbitant interest rate
Translations

scorched earth policy

n (Mil) → Politik fder verbrannten Erde

scorched earth policy

[ˌskɔːtʃtˈɜːθˌpɒlɪsɪ] ntattica del fare terra bruciata
References in periodicals archive ?
PutinBombingSyria by applying scorched earth policy.
The SPLM-N says the Sudanese war planes target areas inhabited by civilians and destroy crops as part of a scorched earth policy aiming to deprive the rebel of any support of local population.
1812: Napoleon entered Moscow, which had been abandoned by the Russians and their scorched earth policy.
But they ended up burning Irish villagers out of their homes in a scorched earth policy so it didn't quite end up in the liberation they intended.
It seems the intention was to evacuate the area and adopt a scorched earth policy, leaving nothing of use to the enemy.
The occupation forces are trying to make up for their failure in confronting the resistance by targeting the civilians and carrying out a scorched earth policy," Abu Zuhri said.
600 oil wells were set on fire as part of the scorched earth policy by the Iraqi military forces.
1812: Napoleon entered Moscow which had been abandoned by the Russians and their scorched earth policy.
Normally this is a pleasant easing-in process, but there had been a major tree clearing operation and whole swathes of land lay devastated, more reminiscent of a scorched earth policy.
The scorched earth policy of the Conservatives will cost them dearly.
A scorched earth policy is a military strategy which involves destroying anything that might be useful to the enemy while advancing through or withdrawing from an area.
In this substantial study, Poser (academic staff member, Protestant theology, Philipps-Universitat Marburg, Germany) offers an interpretation of the book of Ezekiel as a fictional account drawn from the extreme events and suffering that accompanied the destruction of the Jewish Temple of Jerusalem in the 6th century BCE, the eradication of the Jewish kingdom, and deportation of the Jewish people to Babylon by Nebukanezer in what has been termed a scorched earth policy.