scot


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Scot

 (skŏt)
n.
1.
a. A native or inhabitant of Scotland.
b. A person of Scottish ancestry.
2. A member of the ancient Gaelic tribe that migrated to the northern part of Britain from Ireland in about the sixth century ad. See Usage Note at Scottish.

[From Middle English Scottes, Scotsmen, from Old English Scottas, Scotsmen, Irishmen, from Late Latin Scottī, Irishmen.]

scot

 (skŏt)
n.
Money assessed or paid.

[Middle English, tax, partly from Old Norse skot and partly from Old French escot, of Germanic origin; see skeud- in Indo-European roots.]

Scot

(skɒt)
n
1. (Peoples) a native or inhabitant of Scotland
2. (Historical Terms) a member of a tribe of Celtic raiders from the north of Ireland who carried out periodic attacks against the British mainland coast from the 3rd century ad, eventually settling in N Britain during the 5th and 6th centuries
3. (Peoples) a member of a tribe of Celtic raiders from the north of Ireland who carried out periodic attacks against the British mainland coast from the 3rd century ad, eventually settling in N Britain during the 5th and 6th centuries

scot

(skɒt)

n.
an assessment or tax.
[1200–50; Middle English < Old Norse skattr tax, treasure; c. Old English gescot payment]

Scot

(skɒt)

n.
1. a native or inhabitant of Scotland.
2. a member of a group of Irish raiders who shortly before a.d. 500 established a kingdom in the territory of modern Argyll, introducing Gaelic speech and Irish Christianity to the area that became Scotland.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English Scottas (pl.) < Late Latin Scottī]
usage: See Scotch.

Scot.

1. Scotland.
2. Scottish.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.scot - a native or inhabitant of ScotlandScot - a native or inhabitant of Scotland  
Scotland - one of the four countries that make up the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland; located on the northern part of the island of Great Britain; famous for bagpipes and plaids and kilts
European - a native or inhabitant of Europe
Scotchwoman, Scotswoman - a woman who is a Scot
Glaswegian - an inhabitant of Glasgow
Highland Scot, Scottish Highlander, Highlander - a native of the Highlands of Scotland
Lowland Scot, Lowlander, Scottish Lowlander - a native of the Lowlands of Scotland
Translations
Skot
skotte
šotlanešotlanna
skotlantilainen
Škot
スコットランド人
스코틀랜드 사람
skotte
ชาวสกอต
người Scotland

Scot

[skɒt] Nescocés/esa m/f

Scot

[ˈskɒt] nÉcossais(e) m/f
the Scots → les Écossais mpl

Scot

nSchotte m, → Schottin f

Scot

[skɒt] nscozzese m/f
the Scots → gli scozzesi

scot

اِسْكُتْلانْدِيّ Skot skotte Schotte Σκωτσέζος escocés skotlantilainen Écossais Škot scozzese スコットランド人 스코틀랜드 사람 Schots skotte Szkot escocês шотландец skotte ชาวสกอต İskoç người Scotland 苏格兰人
References in classic literature ?
What these are (and in spite of their grim name they are quite innocent) no array of terms would render thinkable to the merely English intelligence; but to the Scot they often prove unctuously nourishing, and Mr.
That's true," he said, gazing at me in a way in which the damned gaze out of their cauldrons of boiling pitch at some soul walking scot free in the place of torment.
Kennedy's countenance strikingly recalled that of Herbert Glendinning, as Sir Walter Scott has depicted it in "The Monastery"; his stature was above six feet; full of grace and easy movement, he yet seemed gifted with herculean strength; a face embrowned by the sun; eyes keen and black; a natural air of daring courage; in fine, something sound, solid, and reliable in his entire person, spoke, at first glance, in favor of the bonny Scot.
Thus the band shot, each in turn, some getting off scot free, and some winning a buffet that always sent them to the grass.
You only know the shell of a Scot until you have entered his home circle; in his office, in clubs, at social gatherings where you and he seem to be getting on so well he is really a house with all the shutters closed and the door locked.
Recruited from all ranks of society and from every civilized country of Europe the great horde of Torn numbered in its ten companies serf and noble; Britain, Saxon, Norman, Dane, German, Italian and French, Scot, Pict and Irish.
I'm not exactly given to brag when I'm away from my own country--one hears too much of that all the time--but between you and me, I shouldn't say that it was possible for two crimes like that to be committed in New York City and for the murderer to get off scot free in either case.
But it is not nature that an English-born man should love a Scot or a Frenchman.
I resolved, therefore, that I would never do it until I saw a chance that would leave me scot free.
Experienced men of the world know very well that it is best to pay scot and lot as they go along, and that a man often pays dear for a small frugality.
Immediately we halted, and though it was at a great distance, we fired, and sent them leaden bullets for wooden arrows, following our shot full gallop, to fall in among them sword in hand--for so our bold Scot that led us directed.
Yes; but the Scots were cruel compatriots for me, sire; they had forced me to forsake the religion of my fathers; they had hung Lord Montrose, the most devoted of my servants, because he was not a Covenanter; and as the poor martyr, to whom they had offered a favor when dying, had asked that his body might be cut into as many pieces as there are cities in Scotland, in order that evidence of his fidelity might be met with everywhere, I could not leave one city, or go into another, without passing under some fragments of a body which had acted, fought, and breathed for me.