Scots


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Related to Scots: Scots language, Scots Irish

Scots

 (skŏts)
adj.
Scottish. See Usage Note at Scottish.
n.
The language traditionally spoken by people living in the Lowlands of Scotland. Scots is sometimes classified as a variety of English and sometimes as a separate language.

[Middle English scottis, variant of scottisc, Scottish, from Scotte, sing. of Scottes, Scotsmen; see Scot.]

Scots

(skɒts)
adj
1. (Peoples) of, relating to, or characteristic of Scotland, its people, their English dialects, or their Gaelic language
2. (Languages) of, relating to, or characteristic of Scotland, its people, their English dialects, or their Gaelic language
3. (Placename) of, relating to, or characteristic of Scotland, its people, their English dialects, or their Gaelic language
n
(Languages) any of the English dialects spoken or written in Scotland. See also Lallans

Scots

(skɒts)

n.
1. any of the dialects of English spoken historically in the Lowlands of Scotland: influenced increasingly by the English of S England since the late 16th century.
adj.
[1325–75; syncopated form of Scottis]
usage: See Scotch.

Scots

A Celtic people from northern Ireland colonizing Argyll in the 5th century and giving their name to Scotland.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Scots - the dialect of English used in ScotlandScots - the dialect of English used in Scotland
English, English language - an Indo-European language belonging to the West Germanic branch; the official language of Britain and the United States and most of the commonwealth countries
Lallans, Scottish Lallans - a dialect of English spoken in the Lowlands of Scotland
Scotland - one of the four countries that make up the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland; located on the northern part of the island of Great Britain; famous for bagpipes and plaids and kilts
Adj.1.Scots - of or relating to or characteristic of Scotland or its people or culture or its English dialect or Gaelic language; "Scots Gaelic"; "the Scots community in New York"; "`Scottish' tends to be the more formal term as in `The Scottish Symphony' or `Scottish authors' or `Scottish mountains'"; "`Scotch' is in disfavor with Scottish people and is used primarily outside Scotland except in such frozen phrases as `Scotch broth' or `Scotch whiskey' or `Scotch plaid'"

Scots

adjective Scottish, Caledonian Scots law differs in many respects from English law.
Translations
skotskýskotština
skotsk
skotlantilainen
škotski
skót nyelvjárás
スコットランドの
스코틀랜드의
škótskyškótština
skotsk
เกี่ยวกับสกอตแลนด์
thuộc Scotland

Scots

[skɒts]
A. ADJescocés
a Scots accentun acento escocés
Scots pinepino m escocés
B. N (Ling) → escocés m

Scots

[ˈskɒts]
adjécossais(e)
a Scots accent → un accent écossais
n (= language) → écossais

Scots

adjschottisch
n (= dialect)Schottisch nt; the Scots (= people)die Schotten pl

Scots

:
Scots law
nschottisches Recht
Scotsman
nSchotte m
Scots pine
nFöhre f, → (gemeine) Kiefer
Scotswoman
nSchottin f

Scots

[skɒts] adjscozzese

Scots

اِسْكُتْلانْدِيّ skotský skotsk schottisch σκωτσέζικος escoceses skotlantilainen écossais škotski scozzese スコットランドの 스코틀랜드의 Schots skotsk szkocki escocês шотландский skotsk เกี่ยวกับสกอตแลนด์ İskoç thuộc Scotland 苏格兰的
References in classic literature ?
Martyrdom made a saint of Mary Queen of Scots three hundred years ago, and she has hardly lost all of her saintship yet.
Tell this not in Gath, lest the Scots rejoice that they have at length found a parallel instance among their neighbours, to that barbarous deed which demolished Arthur's Oven.
He knew there was a vast world outside, to whom Disruption Principles were as the chatter of tree-top apes; the paper brought him chill whiffs from it; he had met Englishmen who had asked lightly if he did not belong to the Church of Scotland, and then had failed to be much interested by his elucidation of that nice point; it was an evil, wild, rebellious world, lying sunk in DOZENEDNESS, for nothing short of a Scots word will paint this Scotsman's feelings.
Yes; but the Scots were cruel compatriots for me, sire; they had forced me to forsake the religion of my fathers; they had hung Lord Montrose, the most devoted of my servants, because he was not a Covenanter; and as the poor martyr, to whom they had offered a favor when dying, had asked that his body might be cut into as many pieces as there are cities in Scotland, in order that evidence of his fidelity might be met with everywhere, I could not leave one city, or go into another, without passing under some fragments of a body which had acted, fought, and breathed for me.
I have often heard of second sight--we have many western Scots in Australia; but I have realised more of its true inwardness in an instant of this afternoon than I did in the whole of my life previously--a granite wall stretching up to the very heavens, so high and so dark that the eye of God Himself cannot see beyond.
But my good Galloway Scots might be better, and I mean to make it so.
Montmorency gave a cry of joy - the cry of a stern warrior who sees his enemy given over to his hands - the sort of cry Cromwell might have uttered when the Scots came down the hill - and flew after his prey.
Books, pictures, china, manuscripts, and the very chair that Mary Queen of Scots sat in when she heard of Darnley's murder.
In an old book I find columns of notes about works projected at this time, nearly all to consist of essays on deeply uninteresting subjects; the lightest was to be a volume on the older satirists, beginning with Skelton and Tom Nash - the half of that manuscript still lies in a dusty chest - the only story was about Mary Queen of Scots, who was also the subject of many unwritten papers.
She was so light-hearted that her laugh is what comes first across the years; so high-spirited that she would have wept like Mary of Scots because she could not lie on the bare plains like the men.
The man was a far-away Scots cousin of my late wife, who bore the honorable name of Bruce, and followed a seafaring life.
We have seen French and Spanish galleys no further away than Southampton, but I doubt that it will be some time before the Scots find their way to these parts.