Scotticism


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Scot·ti·cism

 (skŏt′ĭ-sĭz′əm)
n.
An idiom or other expression characteristic of Scottish English.

Scotticism

(ˈskɒtɪˌsɪzəm)
n
(Linguistics) a Scottish idiom, word, etc

Scotticism, Scoticism, Scottishism

a feature characteristic of Scottish English or a word or phrase commonly used in Scotland rather than in England or America, as bonny.
See also: Language
Translations

Scotticism

[ˈskɒtɪsɪzəm] Ngiro m escocés, escocesismo m

Scotticism

References in periodicals archive ?
However, before Scott, 'literary Scotchmen' had 'exhibited their Scotticism openly, ostentatiously, and with almost plaguy loudness'.
13) Citing Churchill's A New Grammar of the English Language (1823), Visser acknowledges that the verb cause without the infinitive marker to has been traditionally considered a Scotticism (1973, 2256).
AS we enter the New Year I am reminded of my mother's Scotticism, 'Lang may your lum reek'.
In a similar vein is Pat Rogers "Boswell and the Scotticism," which describes how the Laird-to-be of Auch-inleck alternately trembled for and gloried in his sociolinguistic heritage, how he mastered, or nearly mastered, the diction and accent of the South, and how his case resembled Hume's and Robertson's.
1839 tokens of Scotticisms were found throughout the Fife-Rose corpus, giving a rate of one Scotticism token per 123 words.
Chapter 2, 'Models and rivals', gives a sense of the methodological background which Jamieson used in order to construct his dictionary (and, indeed, the lists which predate the dictionary proper), ranging from the seventeenth century lists and glossaries, the eighteenth century Scotticism lists and Boswell's attempted dictionary, as well as the English tradition given recent strength and definition by Johnson.
Once again, an overt Scotticism (the -nae negation particle) is used, not primarily to convey the content of the message, but for the sake of recognition and thus to strengthen the association with Scotland.
12) Alexander was no exception: from then on, he embarked on an unending anglicization of his own writings, which he kept revising in order to expunge as many Scotticisms as possible.
For those less familiar with Scottish culture, the absence of detailed explanatory notes and a glossary of less transparent Scotticisms may be problematic.
Stevenson was writing at a time when the prescriptive tradition in phonology, grammar and vocabulary still considered Scotticisms both barbarous and vulgar, but had no objection to their use in poetry (Dossena, 2005: 116-133).
The sample of the groundskeeper's utterances quoted and examined in section 2 below indeed includes the two lexical Scotticisms wee and haggis (both at turn 2.
16) On debates over these terms, see Marina Dossena, Scotticisms (Edinburgh, 2005), especially vii-ix and 8-17.